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Nutrition and Labeling 101. Speaker Name Speaker Title Date (optional). Nutrition and Health. Do you know which foods you should eat to help you stay healthy? . Nutrition and Health. Nutrition is the process by which the foods we eat provide the nutrients we need to grow and stay healthy.

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Nutrition and Labeling 101

Speaker Name

Speaker Title

Date (optional)

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


Nutrition and health l.jpg
Nutrition and Health

  • Do you know which foods you should eat to help you stay healthy?

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


Nutrition and health3 l.jpg
Nutrition and Health

  • Nutrition is the process by which the foods we eat provide the nutrients we need to grow and stay healthy.

  • Being healthy is about more than just eating right.

  • It is very important to balance calorie intake from foods and beverages with calories expended.

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


Dietary advice and the food guide pyramid l.jpg

NEW

OLD

Introduced in 2005

Introduced in 1992

Dietary Advice and The Food Guide Pyramid

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


The new food guide pyramid mypyramid l.jpg

Why a new pyramid?

MyPyramid was developed to carry the messages of the 2005 dietary guidelines and to make Americans aware of the vital health benefits of simple and modest improvements in nutrition, physical activity and lifestyle behavior.

The New Food Guide Pyramid (MyPyramid)

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


The new food guide pyramid mypyramid6 l.jpg

The key messages include:

Variety - Eat foods from all food groups and subgroups.

Proportionality - Eat more of some foods - Eat less of others.

Moderation - Choose forms of foods that limit intake of saturated or trans fats, added sugars, cholesterol, salt, and alcohol.

Activity - Be physically active every day.

The New Food Guide Pyramid (MyPyramid)

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


The new food guide pyramid mypyramid7 l.jpg
The New Food Guide Pyramid (MyPyramid)

  • What about vegetarians?

    • Vegetarian diets can meet all the recommendations for nutrients.

    • The key for vegetarians is to consume a variety of foods and the right amount of foods to meet their calorie needs.

      • Vegetarians should follow the food group recommendations for their age, sex, and activity level to get the right amount of food and the variety of foods needed for nutrient adequacy.

      • Nutrients that vegetarians may need to focus on include protein, iron, calcium, zinc, and vitamin B12.

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


The new food guide pyramid mypyramid8 l.jpg

Want to know the amount of each food group you need daily? Enter your information at www.mypyramid.gov to find out and receive a customized food guide.

This sample guide was calculated for a:

16 yr old Female

135 lbs.

5’4”

30-60 minutes physical activity

The New Food Guide Pyramid (MyPyramid)

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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Nutrition and Health Enter your information at www.mypyramid.gov to find out and receive a customized food guide.

  • Labeling has been a source of consumer information, including nutrition information, since the 1970's.

  • In the early 1990's the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) revised the food label in major ways.

    • Nutrition labeling is now mandatory for most packaged foods and voluntary for many raw foods.

    • Ingredient lists are required on labels of all foods with more than one ingredient. The ingredients are listed in descending order of weight.

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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The information in the main or top section (see #1-4 and #6), can vary with each food product; it contains product-specific information.

The bottom part (see #5) contains a footnote with Daily Values (DVs) for 2,000 and 2,500 calorie diets. This footnote provides recommended dietary information for important nutrients, including fats, sodium and fiber.

The Food Label

http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/foodlab.html#twoparts

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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The information on the food label is calculated using several food analysis methods.

For example, Calories may be measured by a calorimeter, a device that measures the heat generated by a chemical reaction or change of state.

The Food Label

Dr. Thomas Castonguay at the University of Maryland shows off his bomb calorimeter.

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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Vitamins and minerals may be present in a food naturally, or they may be added through enrichment or fortification.

Enriched foods contain ingredient(s) that are added to restore the original nutritive value of the food that was lost during processing.

Fortified foods contain ingredient(s) that are not normally found in that food in order to achieve a particular dietary purpose.

The Food Label

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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The Food Label they may be added through enrichment or fortification.

  • There's still more! A label carries even more information for consumers.

    • Product name

    • Allergen information

    • Quantity

    • Total percent juice content for juice products

    • Name and address of the manufacturer or packer of the food

    • Grading and inspection symbols for some products

    • Country of origin, if imported

    • Food safety guidelines (e.g. Keep perishable foods refrigerated or frozen)

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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There are also regulations to ensure food labels are not misleading.

In fact, the principal display panel of a packaged food must bear what’s called a “statement of identity”.

Each food has a statement of identity determined by Federal law or regulation.

For example, to be called ice cream or frozen custard a product must conform to this statement of identity!

Sec. 135.110 Ice cream and frozen custard. (a) Description. (1) Ice cream is a food produced by freezing, while stirring, a pasteurized mix consisting of one or more of the optional dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (b) of this section, and may contain one or more of the optional caseinates specified in paragraph (c) of this section subject to the conditions hereinafter set forth, one or more of the optional hydrolyzed milk proteins as provided for in paragraph (d) of this section subject to the conditions hereinafter set forth, and other safe and suitable nonmilk-derived ingredients; and excluding other food fats, except such as are natural components of flavoring ingredients used or are added in incidental amounts to accomplish specific functions. Ice cream is sweetened with safe and suitable sweeteners and may be characterized by the addition of flavoring ingredients. (2) Ice cream contains not less than 1.6 pounds of total solids to the gallon, and weighs not less than 4.5 pounds to the gallon. Ice cream contains not less than 10 percent milkfat, nor less than 10 percent nonfat milk solids, except that when it contains milkfat at 1 percent increments above the 10 percent minimum, it may contain the following milkfat-to-nonfat milk solids levels: ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Minimum percent Percent milkfat nonfat milk solids ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 10.......................................................... 10 11.......................................................... 9 12.......................................................... 8 13.......................................................... 7 14.......................................................... 6 ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Except that when one or more bulky flavors are used, the weights of milkfat and total milk solids are not less than 10 percent and 20 percent, respectively, of the remainder obtained by subtracting the weight of the bulky flavors from the weight of the finished food; but in no case is the weight of milkfat or total milk solids less than 8 percent and 16 percent, respectively, of the weight of the finished food. Except in the case of frozen custard, ice cream contains less than 1.4 percent egg yolk solids by weight of the food, exclusive of the weight of any bulky flavoring ingredients used. Frozen custard shall contain 1.4 percent egg yolk solids by weight of the finished food: Provided, however, That when bulky flavors are added the egg yolk solids content of frozen custard may be reduced in proportion to the amount by weight of the bulky flavors added, but in no case is the content of egg yolk solids in the finished food less than 1.12 percent. A product containing egg yolk solids in excess of 1.4 percent, the maximum set forth in this paragraph for ice cream, may be marketed if labeled as specified by paragraph (e)(1) of this section. (3) When calculating the minimum amount of milkfat and nonfat milk solids required in the finished food, the solids of chocolate or cocoa used shall be considered a bulky flavoring ingredient. In order to make allowance for additional sweetening ingredients needed when certain bulky ingredients are used, the weight of chocolate or cocoa solids used may be multiplied by 2.5; the weight of fruit or nuts used may be multiplied by 1.4; and the weight of partially or wholly dried fruits or fruit juices may be multiplied by appropriate factors to obtain the original weights before drying and this weight may be multiplied by 1.4. (b) Optional dairy ingredients. The optional dairy ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are: Cream; dried cream; plastic cream (sometimes known as concentrated milkfat); butter; butter oil; milk; concentrated milk; evaporated milk; sweetened condensed milk; superheated condensed milk; dried milk; skim milk; concentrated skim milk; evaporated skim milk; condensed skim milk; superheated condensed skim milk; sweetened condensed skim milk; sweetened condensed part-skim milk; nonfat [[Page 360]] dry milk; sweet cream buttermilk; condensed sweet cream buttermilk; dried sweet cream buttermilk; skim milk, that may be concentrated, and from which part or all of the lactose has been removed by a safe and suitable procedure; skim milk in concentrated or dried form that has been modified by treating the concentrated skim milk with calcium hydroxide and disodium phosphate; and whey and those modified whey products (e.g., reduced lactose whey, reduced minerals whey, and whey protein concentrate) that have been determined by FDA to be generally recognized as safe (GRAS) for use in this type of food. Water may be added, or water may be evaporated from the mix. The sweet cream buttermilk and the concentrated sweet cream buttermilk or dried sweet cream buttermilk, when adjusted with water to a total solids content of 8.5 percent, has a titratable acidity of not more than 0.17 percent, calculated as lactic acid. The term ``milk'' as used in this section means cow's milk. Any whey and modified whey products used contribute, singly or in combination, not more than 25 percent by weight of the total nonfat milk solids content of the finished food. The modified skim milk, when adjusted with water to a total solids content of 9 percent, is substantially free of lactic acid as determined by titration with 0.1N NaOH, and it has a Ph value in the range of 8.0 to 8.3. (c) Optional caseinates. The optional caseinates referred to in paragraph (a) of this section that may be added to ice cream mix containing not less than 20 percent total milk solids are: Casein prepared by precipitation with gums, ammonium caseinate, calcium caseinate, potassium caseinate, and sodium caseinate. Caseinate may be added in liquid or dry form, but must be free of excess alkali. (d) Optional hydrolyzed milk proteins. One or more of the optional hydrolyzed milk proteins referred to in paragraph (a) of this section may be added as stabilizers at a level not to exceed 3 percent by weight of ice cream mix containing not less that 20 percent total milk solids, provided that any whey and modified whey products used contribute, singly or in combination, not more than 25 percent by weight of the total nonfat milk solids content of the finished food. Further, when hydrolyzed milk proteins are used in the food, the declaration of these ingredients on the food label shall comply with the requirements of Sec. 102.22 of this chapter. (e) Methods of analysis. The fat content shall be determined by the method prescribed in ``Official Methods of Analysis of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists,'' 13th Ed. (1980), sections 16.287 and 16.059, under ``Fat, Roese-Gottlieb Method--Official Final Action,'' which is incorporated by reference. Copies may be obtained from the Association of Official Analytical Chemists International, 481 North Frederick Ave., suite 500, Gaithersburg, MD 20877-2504, or may be examined at the Office of the Federal Register, 800 North Capitol Street, NW., suite 700, Washington, DC. (f) Nomenclature. (1) The name of the food is ``ice cream''; except that when the egg yolk solids content of the food is in excess of that specified for ice cream by paragraph (a) of this section, the name of the food is ``frozen custard'' or ``french ice cream'' or ``french custard ice cream''. (2)(i) If the food contains no artificial flavor, the name on the principal display panel or panels of the label shall be accompanied by the common or usual name of the characterizing flavor, e.g., ``vanilla'', in letters not less than one-half the height of the letters used in the words ``ice cream''. (ii) If the food contains both a natural characterizing flavor and an artificial flavor simulating it, and if the natural flavor predominates, the name on the principal display panel or panels of the label shall be accompanied by the common name of the characterizing flavor, in letters not less than one-half the height of the letters used in the words ``ice cream'', followed by the word ``flavored'', in letters not less than one-half the height of the letters in the name of the characterizing flavor, e.g., ``Vanilla flavored'', or ``Peach flavored'', or ``Vanilla flavored and Strawberry flavored''. [[Page 361]] (iii) If the food contains both a natural characterizing flavor and an artificial flavor simulating it, and if the artificial flavor predominates, or if artificial flavor is used alone the name on the principal display panel or panels of the label shall be accompanied by the common name of the characterizing flavor in letters not less than one-half the height of the letters used in the words ``ice cream'', preceded by ``artificial'' or ``artificially flavored'', in letters not less than one-half the height of the letters in the name of the characterizing flavor, e.g., ``artificial Vanilla'', or ``artifically flavored Strawberry'' or ``artificially flavored Vanilla and artificially flavored Strawberry''. (3)(i) If the food is subject to the requirements of paragraph (f)(2)(ii) of this section or if it contains any artificial flavor not simulating the characterizing flavor, the label shall also bear the words ``artificial flavor added'' or ``artificial ______ flavor added'', the blank being filled with the common name of the flavor simulated by the artificial flavor in letters of the same size and prominence as the words that precede and follow it. (ii) Wherever the name of the characterizing flavor appears on the label so conspicuously as to be easily seen under customary conditions of purchase, the words prescribed by this paragraph shall immediately and conspicuously precede or follow such name, in a size reasonably related to the prominence of the name of the characterizing flavor and in any event the size of the type is not less than 6-point on packages containing less than 1 pint, not less than 8-point on packages containing at least 1 pint but less than one-half gallon, not less than 10-point on packages containing at least one-half gallon but less than 1 gallon, and not less than 12-point on packages containing 1 gallon or over: Provided, however, That where the characterizing flavor and a trademark or brand are presented together, other written, printed, or graphic matter that is a part of or is associated with the trademark or brand, may intervene if the required words are in such relationship with the trademark or brand as to be clearly related to the characterizing flavor: And provided further, That if the finished product contains more than one flavor of ice cream subject to the requirements of this paragraph, the statements required by this paragraph need appear only once in each statement of characterizing flavors present in such ice cream, e.g., ``Vanilla flavored, Chocolate, and Strawberry flavored, artificial flavors added''. (4) If the food contains both a natural characterizing flavor and an artificial flavor simulating the characterizing flavor, any reference to the natural characterizing flavor shall, except as otherwise authorized by this paragraph, be accompanied by a reference to the artificial flavor, displayed with substantially equal prominence, e.g., ``strawberry and artificial strawberry flavor''. (5) An artificial flavor simulating the characterizing flavor shall be deemed to predominate: (i) In the case of vanilla beans or vanilla extract used in combination with vanillin if the amount of vanillin used is greater than 1 ounce per unit of vanilla constituent, as that term is defined in Sec. 169.3(c) of this chapter. (ii) In the case of fruit or fruit juice used in combination with artificial fruit flavor, if the quantity of the fruit or fruit juice used is such that, in relation to the weight of the finished ice cream, the weight of the fruit or fruit juice, as the case may be (including water necessary to reconstitute partially or wholly dried fruits or fruit juices to their original moisture content) is less than 2 percent in the case of citrus ice cream, 6 percent in the case of berry or cherry ice cream, and 10 percent in the case of ice cream prepared with other fruits. (iii) In the case of nut meats used in combination with artificial nut flavor, if the quantity of nut meats used is such that, in relation to the finished ice cream the weight of the nut meats is less than 2 percent. (iv) In the case of two or more fruits or fruit juices, or nut meats, or both, used in combination with artificial flavors simulating the natural flavors and dispersed throughout the food, if the quantity of any fruit or fruit juice or nut meat is less than one-half the applicable percentage specified in paragraph (e)(5) (ii) or (iii) of this section. [[Page 362]] For example, if a combination ice cream contains less than 5 percent of bananas and less than 1 percent of almonds it would be ``artificially flavored banana-almond ice cream''. However, if it contains more than 5 percent of bananas and more than 1 percent of almonds it would be ``banana-almond flavored ice cream''. (6) If two or more flavors of ice cream are distinctively combined in one package, e.g., ``Neapolitan'' ice cream, the applicable provisions of this paragraph shall govern each flavor of ice cream comprising the combination. (7) Until September 14, 1998, when safe and suitable sweeteners other than nutritive carbohydrate sweeteners are used in the food, their presence shall be declared by their common or usual name on the principal display panel of the label as part of the statement of identity in letters that shall be no less than one-half the size of the type used in the term ``ice cream'' but in any case no smaller than one- sixteenth of an inch. If the food purports to be or is represented for special dietary use, it shall bear labeling in accordance with the requirements of part 105 of this chapter. (g) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter, except that the sources of milkfat or milk solids not fat may be declared in descending order of predominance either by the use of all the terms ``milkfat and nonfat milk'' when one or any combination of two or more of the ingredients listed in Sec. 101.4(b)(3), (b)(4), (b)(8), and (b)(9) of this chapter are used or, alternatively, as permitted in Sec. 101.4 of this chapter. Under section 403(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, artificial color need not be declared in ice cream, except as required by Sec. 101.22(c) or (k) of this chapter. Voluntary declaration of all colors used in ice cream and frozen custard is recommended.

The Food Label

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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Health Claims misleading.

  • Health claims linking a nutrient or food and a disease may appear on a label too. These claims are regulated by the government and give important information about how diet affects health.

Example health claim

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


Hot topics in nutrition good fats vs bad fats l.jpg
Hot Topics in Nutrition: misleading.“Good Fats” vs. “Bad Fats”

  • The 2005 Dietary Guidelines recommend:

    • Consume less than 10% of calories from saturated fatty acids and less than 300 mg/day of cholesterol, and keep trans fatty acid consumption as low as possible.

    • Keep total fat intake between 20 to 35% of calories, with most fats coming from sources of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, such as fish, nuts, and vegetable oils.

    • When selecting and preparing meat, poultry, dry beans, and milk or milk products, make choices that are lean, low-fat, or fat-free.

    • Limit intake of fats and oils high in saturated and/or trans fatty acids, and choose products low in such fats and oils.

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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“Good Fats” vs. “Bad Fats” misleading.

  • So, what are saturated fats? Trans fatty acids? Polyunsaturated fatty acids? Monounsaturated fatty acids?

  • They are types of lipids!

  • Lipids consist of a wide group of compounds that are generally soluble in organic solvents and largely insoluble in water.

  • Lipidsare deposited in some animal tissues and organs of some plants.

  • When the lipid is refined it is available to consumers as edible oil or fat.

    • Oils are usually liquid at room temperature.

    • Fats are usually solid at room temperature.

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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Lipids are generally triesters of glycerol and fatty acids misleading.(triglycerides) which as the name implies, means that they are composed of three fatty acids bonded by an ester linkage to a glycerol “backbone” structure.

The fatty acids can have many different structures.

“Good Fats” vs. “Bad Fats”

A triglyceride molecule

Fatty acid

Fatty acid

Glycerol

“backbone”

Fatty acid

Ester linkage

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


Fatty acids l.jpg

Saturated Fatty Acids = misleading.

No Double Bonds

Stearic Acid

18:0

H

H

Oleic Acid

18:1 cis-9

Monounsaturated Fatty Acids =

One Double Bond

H

Elaidic Acid

18:1 trans-9

H

Linoleic Acid

18:2 cis-9 cis-12

Polyunsaturated

Fatty Acids =

More than One

Double Bond

Rumenic Acid

18:2 cis-9, trans-11

α-Linolenic Acid

cis-9 cis-12 cis-15

Fatty Acids

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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Saturated Fatty Acids misleading.

  • Saturated fatty acids have been shown to raise the level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) the so-called “bad cholesterol”.

  • This increase in the LDL/HDL ratio has been shown to increase the risk for coronary-heart disease (CHD).

  • Which is why the dietary guidelines recommend to “Limit intake of fats and oils high in saturated fatty acids…”

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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Saturated Fatty Acids misleading.

  • Foods that contain a high proportion of saturated fatty acids are:

    • Butter and other dairy products

    • Meat

    • Ghee

    • Lard

    • Coconut Oil

    • Palm Kernel Oil

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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H misleading.

H

Trans-Fatty Acids

  • Trans-fatty acids have been shown to raise the level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) the so-called “bad cholesterol” AND decrease high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), the so-called “good” cholesterol.

  • Such changes in the LDL/HDL ratio have been shown to increase the risk for coronary-heart disease (CHD), and are thought by some to have a greater effect than the changes from saturated fatty acid consumption.

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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Fats and oils that may contain* a high proportion of misleading.trans-fatty acids are:

Margarine

Frying Fats

Shortening

Most food companies have voluntarily eliminated trans fatty acids from their products.

In some cases it is very difficult to replace the functionality of trans fatty acids

Many counties and cities are now banning the use of artificial trans fatty acids in restaurants.

Trans-Fatty Acids

*Many have been reformulated

to contain low or no

trans fatty acids

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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Why are they only banning artificial misleading.trans fatty acids from restaurants?

Some trans-fatty acids occur naturally in small amounts in the milk and body fat of ruminants such as cows and sheep.

As a result, trans fatty acids also occur in small amounts in products that contain meat and/or dairy.

The trans fatty acids in these products is in the form of Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA).

CLA has been shown to reduce the incidence of tumors in animal models.

Trans-Fatty Acids

Grams of trans fat in several

meat and dairy products

Rumenic Acid is a type of

Conjugated Linoleic Acid

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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As of January 1, 2006, food manufacturers under FDA’s jurisdiction are required to include the Trans Fat content of their products on the nutrition label.

The 2005 Dietary Guidelines recommend:

Limit intake of fats and oils high in saturated and/or trans fatty acids, and choose products low in such fats and oils.

Trans-Fatty Acids and the Food Label

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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Monounsaturated Fatty Acids jurisdiction are required to include the

  • Some studies show that eating foods that contain monounsaturated fatty acids can reduce levels of LDL-cholesterol in the blood.

  • Monounsaturated fatty acids tend to lower LDL-cholesterol without affecting HDL levels.

  • Lowering levels of LDL cholesterol generally decreases coronary- heart disease (CHD) risk.

Oleic Acid

18:1 cis-9

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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Monounsaturated Fatty Acids jurisdiction are required to include the

  • Foods that are high in monounsaturated fats are:

    • Olive oil

    • Canola oil

    • Nuts

    • Avocado

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


Polyunsaturated fatty acids l.jpg
Polyunsaturated fatty acids jurisdiction are required to include the

  • Polyunsaturated fatty acids tend to lower both HDL- and LDL-cholesterol.

  • Such changes in the LDL/HDL ratio have also been shown to decrease the risk for coronary-heart disease (CHD).

Rumenic Acid

18:2 cis-9, trans-11

α-Linolenic Acid

cis-9 cis-12 cis-15

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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Specific polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid, are called essential fatty acids because it is essential that they be obtained from food. They are necessary for cell structure and making hormones.

Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

Linoleic Acid

18:2 cis-9 cis-12

α-Linolenic Acid

18:3 cis-9 cis-12 cis-15

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and alpha-linolenic acid, are called essential fatty acids because it is essential that they be obtained from food. They are necessary for cell structure and making hormones.

  • The essential fatty acid, alpha-linolenic acid, is also considered an omega-3 fatty acid.

  • Some research suggests that this fatty acid, which is found in walnuts, flaxseed oil, and canola oil, may reduce the risk of coronary-heart disease.

α-Linolenic Acid

18:3 cis-9 cis-12 cis-15

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


Polyunsaturated fatty acids31 l.jpg
Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and alpha-linolenic acid, are called essential fatty acids because it is essential that they be obtained from food. They are necessary for cell structure and making hormones.

  • There is greater scientific evidence that other omega-3 fatty acids, not essential to the diet, may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease (CHD).

  • These include EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids.

  • EPA and DHA can be found naturally in oily fish, such as salmon, lake trout, tuna and herring.

Eicosapentaenoic acid(EPA)

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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“Good Fats” vs. “Bad Fats” and alpha-linolenic acid, are called essential fatty acids because it is essential that they be obtained from food. They are necessary for cell structure and making hormones.

  • It is not so easy to classify all fats as “Good Fats” or “Bad Fats”.

  • Remember:

    • Variety - Eat foods from all food groups and subgroups

    • Proportionality - Eat more of some foods (fruit, vegetables, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat milk products) - Eat less of others (foods high in saturated or trans fats, added sugars, cholesterol, salt, and alcohol)

    • Moderation - Choose forms of foods that limit intake of saturated or trans fats, added sugars, cholesterol, salt, and alcohol

    • Activity - Be physically active every day

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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Job Titles: and alpha-linolenic acid, are called essential fatty acids because it is essential that they be obtained from food. They are necessary for cell structure and making hormones.

Nutrition Scientist

Nutritionist

Consumer Safety Officer

Registered Dietitian (RD)

Scientist

Employers:

Food processors

Ingredient manufacturers/suppliers

Health care providers

Government agencies

Academia (Higher Education)

Contract research laboratories/development firms

Self-employed/Consultant

Responsibilities:

Develop nutrition guidelines

Develop labeling guidelines

Investigate health claims

Assess nutritional content of foods

Improve nutritional content of foods

Develop nutrition labels

Advise patients

Careers in Nutrition and Labeling

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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Job Titles: and alpha-linolenic acid, are called essential fatty acids because it is essential that they be obtained from food. They are necessary for cell structure and making hormones.

Product Development Scientist

Scientist

Employers:

Food processors

Ingredient manufacturers/suppliers

Academia (Higher Education)

Contract research laboratories/development firms

Self-employed/Consultant

Careers in Product Development

  • Responsibilities:

    • Bench-top development

    • Testing

    • Plant scale-up

    • Commercialization

    • Troubleshooting

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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Want to learn more? and alpha-linolenic acid, are called essential fatty acids because it is essential that they be obtained from food. They are necessary for cell structure and making hormones.

  • Visit:

    • http://www.ift.org

    • http://school.discovery.com/foodscience/

  • Find a Food Scientist:

    • A database of IFT members who are willing to

      provide more information about the field of food

      science to you

    • http://members.ift.org/IFT/Education/TeacherResources/findafoodscientist.htm

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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Questions? and alpha-linolenic acid, are called essential fatty acids because it is essential that they be obtained from food. They are necessary for cell structure and making hormones.

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


Activity l.jpg
Activity and alpha-linolenic acid, are called essential fatty acids because it is essential that they be obtained from food. They are necessary for cell structure and making hormones.

  • Calorimeter

  • There’s Iron in My Breakfast Cereal?

© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


References l.jpg
References and alpha-linolenic acid, are called essential fatty acids because it is essential that they be obtained from food. They are necessary for cell structure and making hormones.

  • Belitz HD and Grosch W. 1999. Food Chemistry. Berlin: Springer. 992 pgs.

  • Elliot D. Science finds one use for fruitcake: Blow it up! <Accessed on July 13, 2007, Published on April 30, 2006> http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6700905

  • FDA. FDA Announces Qualified Health Claims for Omega-3 Fatty Acids. <Accessed on January 22, 2008, Published on September 8, 2004> http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/news/2004/NEW01115.html.

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© 2007 Institute of Food Technologists


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Headquarters and alpha-linolenic acid, are called essential fatty acids because it is essential that they be obtained from food. They are necessary for cell structure and making hormones.

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