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Improving Digital Equality and the Effective Public Service Delivery in Taiwan. 詹中原 Chung-Yuang Jan, Ph.D. 國立政治大學公共行政研究所教授 Professor at the Graduate Institute of Public Administration, National Cheng-chi University. 1. INTRODUCTION. Points to be discussed:

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Improving digital equality and the effective public service delivery in taiwan l.jpg

Improving Digital Equality and theEffective Public Service Delivery in Taiwan

詹中原

Chung-Yuang Jan, Ph.D.

國立政治大學公共行政研究所教授

Professor at the Graduate Institute

of Public Administration,

National Cheng-chi University


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1. INTRODUCTION

  • Points to be discussed:

  • First, the formation of the society of Information under the development of Information and Communication Technology(ICT).

  • Second, the transformation of public service delivery in e-government context and the approach of New Public Management(NPM), and of course, the issues of equity(such as digital divide) and democracy(such as digital democracy).

  • Finally, the case of public service delivery of digital equality in Taiwan will be analyzed.


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The New Public Management Movement and the ICTs (I)

  • Terry(1998) pointed out that the public management includes four approaches, that is quantitative/analytic management, political management, liberation management, and market-driven management:

    a. Quantitative/analytic management has its intellectual roots in policy analysis and the discipline of economics, and emphasis on the strategic use of sophisticated analytical techniques such as forecasting and cost-benefit analysis.

    b. Political management focuses on the politics of public management, and it rejects outright the politics/administration dichotomy.


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The New Public Management Movement and the ICTs (II)

  • c. Liberation management is guided by the idea that public managers are highly skilled and committed individuals who already know how to manage. Consequently, the supposedly poor performance of public bureaucracies is not the result of managerial incompetence or malfeasance.

  • d. Market-driven management is influenced by two fundamental ideas. The first of these, competition, is guided by the neo-classical economics belief in the efficient of markets. The second idea relates to the universal or generic character of private-sector management


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The New Public Management Movement and the ICTs (III)

  • Ferlie, et al. (1996) postulated the view that transformational change involves multiple processes of change from different sources occurring simultaneously.

  • In “The National Performance Review” report (Gore, 1993), it suggests that e-government will allow citizens broader and more timely access to information and service through efficient, customer-responsive process-thereby creating a fundamental revision in the relationship between the federal government and everyone served by it.


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ICTs, Equality, and Democracy (I)

  • The key features of information and communication technologies (ICTs) are claimed to the potential for the development of a new variety of democracy. The reasons are as follows (Hague and Loader, 1999):

  • a. Interactivity - users may communicate on a many-many reciprocal basis.

  • b. Global network - communication is not fettered by nation-state boundaries.

  • c. Free speech – net users may express their opinions with limited state censorship.


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ICTs, Equality, and Democracy (II)

  • d. Free association – net users may join virtual communities of common interest.

  • e. Construction and dissemination of information – net users may produce and share information that is not subject to official review or sanction.

  • f. Challenge to professional and official perspectives – state and professional information may be challenged.

  • g. Breakdown of nation-state identity – users may begin to adopt global and local identities.


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Toward Digital Equality: The Case in Taiwan (I)

  • In Taiwan, the vision The E-government includes (RDEC, 2002, visited on 10/20/2004):

  • a. To employ information and communications technology in support of government re-engineering, provide innovative services, improve administrative efficiency, and raise the quality of public service.

  • b. To reform civil servants’ operating procedures and re-engineer the handling of public business so as to take advantage of modern computer and network communications technology, thereby making government agencies dramatically more flexible and responsive, accelerating service speed, extending service time, broadening geographical service scope, enriching service options, and lowering costs.


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Toward Digital Equality: The Case in Taiwan (II)

  • c. To enable government agencies, businesses, and the public to conveniently obtain a variety of government services via a broad range of channels at any time and place, and to provide integrated, innovative interdepartmental services such as "exemption from need for physical transcripts," "paperless applications," "one-stop services," "multi-point, multi-channel, 24-hour services," and "service to the home," etc.


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Toward Digital Equality: The Case in Taiwan (III)

Resource from: RDEC, 2002, visited on 10/20/2004


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District            Item

Number ofFamily

PopularizationRatio (%)

PC number inevery 100households

Connection toInternet (%)

Total

6,681,685

46.02

49.75

33.58

Taiwan

6,588,644

46.49

50.27

33.91

Taiwan Province

5,211,413

42.82

46.53

29.81

Northern District

2,096,641

50.63

55.73

36.99

Taipei City

1,115,962

52.76

57.39

41.85

Keelung City

128,073

42.72

44.35

30.17

Ilan County

131,604

35.32

39.42

21.00

Hsinchu City

110,400

57.01

67.79

33.28

Hsinchu County

114,249

46.70

50.96

26.93

Taoyuan County

496,353

51.41

57.67

35.22

Status of PC Uses in Families in Taiwan and Its Surrounding Areas By end of 2000 (I—North District)

Resource from: Reduce Digital Divide, visited on 10/18/2004.


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Middle District

1,504,563

41.28

44.73

26.00

Miaoli County

144,591

31.87

34.59

22.24

Taichung City

302,877

56.67

59.76

35.35

Taichung County

393,351

47.02

51.62

30.16

Changhua County

316,168

39.44

42.76

26.00

Nantou County

149,363

34.46

38.77

16.64

Yunlin County

198,213

21.31

23.12

13.29

Status of PC Uses in Families in Taiwan and Its Surrounding Areas By end of 2000 (II—Middle District)

Resource from: Reduce Digital Divide, visited on 10/18/2004


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South District

1,432,033

34.56

36.78

25.30

Chia-I City

79,151

39.62

42.33

24.81

Chia-I County

153,673

24.27

25.30

16.59

Tainan City

227,223

46.91

51.07

33.64

Tainan County

322,909

36.72

39.70

24.43

Kaohsiung Country

374,419

31.82

33.11

23.72

Pingdong County

247,300

31.06

32.49

27.17

Penghu County

27,358

18.57

21.13

7.35

East District

178,176

30.37

31.90

15.82

Taitung County

72,483

25.44

25.84

13.79

Hualian County

105,693

33.75

36.05

17.22

Status of PC Uses in Families in Taiwan and Its Surrounding Areas By end of 2000 (III—South and East District)

Resource from: Reduce Digital Divide, visited on 10/18/2004


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Taipei City

885,492

67.48

71.19

55.79

Kaohsiung City

491,739

47.63

52.24

37.91

Lienchuang District

19,493

61.13

61.13

49.04

Lienchuang County (note)

17,985

62.28

62.28

60.05

Kinmen County (note)

1,508

47.44

47.44

38.44

Data originate:Survey of Families Plan in 2000 by Directorate Generalof Budget, Accounting, and Statistics, EY

Note: Computer popularization, amount of computersin every hundred families and the percentage of Internetconnection are the estimations by the data fromthe investigation business department.

Status of PC Uses in Families in Taiwan and Its Surrounding Areas By end of 2000 (IV—Taipei and Kaohsiung City and other District)

Resource from: Reduce Digital Divide, visited on 10/18/2004


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Conclusion

  • In order to toward digital equality, there should be several steps need to be done:

  • 1. Regard users' needs as the principle, classification and rearrangement on various topic contents;

  • 2. Establish a complete and ordering digital divide database, in order to provide public on-line information referencing and searching;

  • 3. Setup the information platform in the boo-ay districts;

  • 4. Improve the information literacy to the information poor.


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Thank you !!


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