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Using Data from the CCSSE to Encourage Change Maureen Pettitt, Ph.D. Leslie Croot, M.S. Session Topics CCSSE Overview CCSSE-Generated Reports SVC-Generated Presentation & Reports Use of Reports CCSSE Overview Emphasis on student engagement and student learning (e.g., Astin, Tinto, Pace)

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Using data from the ccsse to encourage change l.jpg

Using Data from the CCSSE to Encourage Change

Maureen Pettitt, Ph.D.

Leslie Croot, M.S.


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Session Topics

  • CCSSE Overview

  • CCSSE-Generated Reports

  • SVC-Generated Presentation & Reports

  • Use of Reports


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CCSSE Overview

  • Emphasis on student engagement and student learning (e.g., Astin, Tinto, Pace)

  • Adapted from the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE)

  • Funding from Lumina Foundation for Education and Pew Charitable Trusts

  • Administered by Community College Leadership Program at UTA

  • Pilot test in 2001; field test in 2002


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Student Engagement

  • Students who get involved with the people and activities of the college (beyond the traditional classroom) have

    • higher retention rates;

    • greater personal growth, achievement and satisfaction; and

    • increased participation in further learning opportunities

      (Astin, 1985)


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CCSSE Contents

  • Active & Collaborative Learning

  • Student Effort

  • Student-Faculty Interaction

  • College Contribution to Knowledge, Skills & Personal Development

  • Mental Activities

  • Student Demographics


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2003 CCSSE Participants

  • National

    • 93 community colleges; 65,300 usable surveys

  • Northwest Consortium

    • Six WA community colleges & one in BC; 3,480 usable surveys

    • 19 additional questions

  • SVC

    • Surveyed 850 students in 60 classes; 765 usable surveys


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CCSSE-Generated Reports

  • College Results

    • Summary: Successes and Areas for Improvement

    • Aggregate percents for all colleges and for SVC

  • Mean Comparisons

    • SVC, consortium, all colleges

  • Frequency Distributions

    • SVC, consortium, all colleges


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CCSSE-Generated Reports

  • Benchmarks -- five benchmarks from 38 engagement items on the CCSSE

    • Active & Collaborative Learning

    • Student Effort

    • Academic Challenge

    • Student-Faculty Interaction

    • Support for Learners


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Other CCSSE “Tools”

  • On the website

    • Interpreting and working with results

    • Developing storylines

    • Powerpoint template & talking points

  • National reports

  • Highlights


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Internal Reports: The Challenge

  • Creating reports that are both meaningful and can inform change at the institution

    • Knowing what the issues are and how the data can shed light on those issues (also: what issues can be “fixed” with information?)

    • Having a network of faculty & staff at the college who know the issues and will ask for specific reports


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Internally-Generated Reports & Presentations

  • Gen Ed Task Force Summer Retreat

  • Two Fall In-Service Presentations

  • Article for Fall Teaching & Learning Newsletter

  • Library & Media Services

  • Diversity Steering Committee

  • Information Technology

  • Student Services Programs

  • Student Government


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General Education Task Force

  • Gen Ed Task Force Summer Retreat 2003

    • Data presented according to existing gen ed principles and outcomes

    • Generated discussions about what wasn’t in our current outcomes (i.e., Information Literacy)

    • Provided insight into the efficacy of our pedagogical approaches (i.e., learning communities, infusion of critical thinking and cultural pluralism, etc.)


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General Education Outcomes

  • Communications

  • Critical Thinking

  • Quantitative Reasoning

  • Development & Features of Culture

  • Putting Knowledge into Action

  • Overarching Learning & Development Goals


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To what extent has your experience at this college contributed to your knowledge, skills, and personal development in the following area: Acquiring a broad general education


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In your experience at this college during the current school year, about how often have you done each of the following: Prepared two or more drafts of a paper or assignment before turning it in


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In-Service Presentation Fall 03 year, about how often have you done each of the following:

  • Purpose – provide an overview and generate discussions (information was also the basis for T & L Newsletter article)

    • “Most Frequent” (at least 20% of the respondents reported they did this “very often”) and “Least Frequent” (at least 20% of the students reported they had “never” done this)

    • General Education-related outcomes

    • Student satisfaction with services


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Most Frequent year, about how often have you done each of the following:

  • Worked on a paper or project that required integrating ideas or information from various sources – 31.1%

  • Prepared two or more drafts of a paper before turning it in – 29.5%

  • Asked questions in class or contributed to class discussions – 27.1%

  • Used an electronic medium (list-serv, chat group, Internet, etc.) to discuss or complete an assignment – 24.0%


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Most Frequent year, about how often have you done each of the following:

  • Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with others outside of class (students, family members, co-workers, etc.) – 23.5%

  • Worked with other students on projects during class – 22.7%

  • Had serious conversations with students who differ from you in terms of their religious beliefs, political opinions, or personal values – 20.5%


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Least Frequent year, about how often have you done each of the following:

  • Participated in a community-based project as part of a regular course – 67.5%

  • Worked with instructors on activities other than coursework – 62.0%

  • Tutored or taught other students (paid or voluntary) – 59.4%

  • Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with instructors outside of class – 35.5%


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Least Frequent year, about how often have you done each of the following:

  • Used an electronic medium (list-serv, chat group, Internet, etc.) to discuss or complete an assignment – 23.3%

  • Come to class without completing readings or assignments – 22.3%

  • Talked about career plans with an instructor or advisor – 20.9%

  • Used e-mail to communicate with an instructor – 20.4%


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Learning Communities year, about how often have you done each of the following:

  • Always questions on campus about the benefit of collaborative courses

  • CCSSE question asking whether the student had taken a learning community, had not, but planned to, or had not and did not intend to take.


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Mental Activities year, about how often have you done each of the following:

  • Similar in structure to Bloom’s Taxonomy

  • Prompt: “During the current school year, to what extent has your coursework emphasized the following mental activities…”

  • Response Options: Range from 1 “Very Little” to 4 “Very Much”


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Groupings year, about how often have you done each of the following:

  • SVC 1 = SVC students who had taken a learning community or linked course

  • SVC 2 = SVC students who had not, but planned to take a learning community or linked course

  • SVC 3 = SVC students who had not taken and did not plan to take a learning community or linked course

  • Consortium = all students in the Northwest consortium of colleges, excluding those from Skagit Valley College and Douglas College

  • All = all students who participated in the CCSSE Survey, based on 93 colleges


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”memorizing facts, ideas, or methods from your courses and readings so you can repeat them in pretty much the same form.”




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Library/Media Services experiences in new ways.”

  • Additional questions on library use, library resources, use of Internet, and knowledge/skill acquired to conduct information searches

  • Only comparison with consortium colleges

  • SVC used the library more, acquired more skills/knowledge, but were less satisfied with the library resources.


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Diversity Steering Committee experiences in new ways.”

  • Burning question: how did students of color compare with their white counterparts

  • There were few significant differences, except SOC had better relationships with administrative personnel

  • Limitations—N for SOC = 78; these were students of color who had transitioned to the “mainstream” (versus ESL students)


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Information Technology experiences in new ways.”

  • IT Dean was then-chair of the State Information Technology Council

  • Prepared a report he presented at an ITC meeting showing consortium results for nine IT-related CCSSE items

  • Also prepared an SVC report showing college-consortium comparisons


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Student Services experiences in new ways.”

  • Created a 71-page report just for Student Services:

    • Summary of Significant Findings

    • Career Counseling

    • Admissions

    • Placement

    • Advising/Financial Aid Advising

    • Registration

    • Financial Aid

    • Student Life


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Counselors/Advisors experiences in new ways.”

  • Where do you most often get information about the requirements for your educational program?

  • Academic advising/planning: How often do you use? How satisfied? How important?

  • How often do you use career counseling?

  • How often do you use transfer credit assistance?


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Students with Risk Factors experiences in new ways.”

  • Analysis of CCSSE student responses based on risk factors:

    • Academically Under-prepared

    • Financially Independent

    • Single Parent

    • English Not Native Language

    • Parent’s Education

    • Disabled


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Breakdown by Risk Category (N=765) experiences in new ways.”

  • Three categories in analysis:

    • No Risk -- risk factors = 0 (19%)

    • Low Risk -- risk factors =1 (34%)

    • At Risk -- 2 or more risk factors (47%)


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Students at Risk Study experiences in new ways.”

  • Used this data to follow-up with SVC Student Support Services (TRIO Grant) program participants

    • SSS program goal: provide educational opportunities for disadvantaged students


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TRIO Program Evaluation experiences in new ways.”

  • Created an instrument with CCSSE items; very targeted; no demographic data

  • Given at end of quarter in College Success Skills course for SSS students

  • Part of the SSS program’s Outcomes Assessment Plan

  • Track results of SSS students over time/against CCSSE baseline using students designated as “at risk” (two or more risk factors) for comparison


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College Support experiences in new ways.”

  • SSS participants feel the college helped them cope with non-academic responsibilities more than all other groups (p < .001).

  • SSS participants feel the college helped them thrive socially more than all other groups (p < .001).

  • SSS participants feel the college provided the support they needed to succeed more than all other groups (p = .006).


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Use of Services experiences in new ways.”

  • SSS participants sought financial aid advising, and career counseling more than the "Low Risk" and "At Risk" groups.

  • SSS participants used services for people with disabilities more than all other groups.

  • SSS participants used academic advising/ planning more than all of the other groups

  • SSS participants used peer or other tutoring more than the "No Risk" and "Low Risk" groups, but not the “At Risk.”


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The "At Risk" group felt they had a poorer relationship with instructors compared to the "No Risk" group (p = .007). However, the "SSS Users" felt they had a better relationship with instructors compared to the "At Risk" group (p < .001). There were no other differences between the groups.


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The "At Risk" group felt they had a poorer relationship with administrative personnel compared to the "No Risk" group (p = .028). However, the "SSS participants" felt they had a better relationship with administrative personnel than the "Low Risk" group (p = .001) or the "At Risk" group (p < .001). There were no other differences between the groups.


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Student Government administrative personnel compared to the "No Risk" group (p = .028). However, the "SSS participants" felt they had a better relationship with administrative personnel than the "Low Risk" group (p = .001) or the "At Risk" group (p < .001). There were no other differences between the groups.

  • Short report and presentation at ASSVC meeting

  • Student government reps were interested in general demographics, how students spent their time, and student participation in extra- and co-curricular activities


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Using the results administrative personnel compared to the "No Risk" group (p = .028). However, the "SSS participants" felt they had a better relationship with administrative personnel than the "Low Risk" group (p = .001) or the "At Risk" group (p < .001). There were no other differences between the groups.


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Using the results administrative personnel compared to the "No Risk" group (p = .028). However, the "SSS participants" felt they had a better relationship with administrative personnel than the "Low Risk" group (p = .001) or the "At Risk" group (p < .001). There were no other differences between the groups.

  • Included data in Board of Trustee Monitoring Reports on Ends Policies

    • Student Satisfaction & Success

    • Institutional Diversity

  • Provided reports and presentations for various groups


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Using the Results administrative personnel compared to the "No Risk" group (p = .028). However, the "SSS participants" felt they had a better relationship with administrative personnel than the "Low Risk" group (p = .001) or the "At Risk" group (p < .001). There were no other differences between the groups.

  • Folks at the college who moved to an action phase spent time identifying specific things they wanted to improve, prioritizing them, and designing low-cost, uncomplicated interventions (“quick wins”)


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Fifth-Year Accreditation Report administrative personnel compared to the "No Risk" group (p = .028). However, the "SSS participants" felt they had a better relationship with administrative personnel than the "Low Risk" group (p = .001) or the "At Risk" group (p < .001). There were no other differences between the groups.

  • Spring 2004 (1 yr later)

  • All reports compiled in a big notebook

  • Included documentation from CCSSE recognizing SVC as a “Best Practice College” and one of four colleges in the nation to get the MetLife Foundation award


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Future Plans administrative personnel compared to the "No Risk" group (p = .028). However, the "SSS participants" felt they had a better relationship with administrative personnel than the "Low Risk" group (p = .001) or the "At Risk" group (p < .001). There were no other differences between the groups.

  • Administer CCSSE in Spring 2005 and 2007

  • Cross-time comparisons available for accreditation self-study and 10-year visit in 2009


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Thanks for your attention! administrative personnel compared to the "No Risk" group (p = .028). However, the "SSS participants" felt they had a better relationship with administrative personnel than the "Low Risk" group (p = .001) or the "At Risk" group (p < .001). There were no other differences between the groups.


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