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Onychophora Tardigrada Anomalocarididae Trilobitomorpha Chelicerata Crustacea Myriapoda Insecta - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Natural Sciences 360 Legacy of Life Lecture 08 Dr. Stuart S. Sumida. Finishing Protostomes. Onychophora Tardigrada Anomalocarididae Trilobitomorpha Chelicerata Crustacea Myriapoda Insecta. ARTHROPODA Mandibulata . Hurdia – from the Burgess Shale. Hurdia

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Natural Sciences 360

Legacy of Life

Lecture 08

Dr. Stuart S. Sumida

Finishing Protostomes


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Onychophora

Tardigrada

Anomalocarididae

Trilobitomorpha

Chelicerata

Crustacea

Myriapoda

Insecta

ARTHROPODA

Mandibulata


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Hurdia – from the Burgess Shale.


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Hurdia

Amongst the most primitive and oldest known of true arthropods.

Belongs to a group call the Anomalocarididae.

Known from the Late Cambrian Burgess Shale.

It demonstrates earliest evidence and example of the organization of the “head shield) region.


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  • TRILOBITOMORPHA

  • Oldest known of arthropods.

  • Excellent examples known back to Cambrian period (about 540 million years ago).

  • Survived until Early Permian (about 280 million years ago).

  • Usually considered to be very basal (primitive) member of Arthropoda.


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TRILOBITOMORPHA

Oldest known of arthropods.

Known back to Cambrian period (about 540 million years ago).

Survived until Early Permian (about 280 million years ago).

Usually considered to be very basal (primitive) member of Arthropoda.


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CHELICERATA

Includes spiders, scorpions, eurypterids

Have specialized mouth parts (but not jaws) called chelicerae.




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Onychophora

Tardigrada

Anomalocarididae

Trilobitomorpha

Chelicerata

Crustacea

Myriapoda

Insecta

ARTHROPODA

Mandibulata


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MANDIBULATA – Arthropods with jaws. Includes crustaceans, insects, and others

CRUSTACEA

Includes crabs, lobsters, shrimp, one terrestrial group—pill bugs.

Primarily marine.





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Insects are thought to have evolved from MYRIAPODS through the phenomenon known as NEOTONY

NEOTONY – the retention of juvenile features and characters will attaining sexual maturity.


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Insects exploited the land with little or no competition. the phenomenon known as NEOTONY

Key innovations that allowed this:

1st – Chitonous exoskeleton hardened and became more waterproof.

Later (after insects had already appeared) - wings.


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The most primitive insects (called APTERYGOTES) did not have wings.

“Apterygotes” “Paleopterans” Neoptera



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The most primitive insects (called APTERYGOTES) did not have wings.

“Apterygotes” “Paleopterans” Neoptera


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The more primitive winges insecs includde mayflies (Ephemeroptera) and the ODONATA.

The ODONATA includes damselflies and dragon flies.


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Original function of insect wings: (Ephemeroptera) and the

Probably not for flight, but for thermoregulation.


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The most primitive insects (called APTERYGOTES) did not have wings.

“Apterygotes” “Paleopterans” Neoptera


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LOTS and LOTS of insect groups: wings.

Amongst the most important:

Coleptera (beetles)

Hymenoptera (ants, bees, wasps, others)

Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies)


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Coleoptera (beetles) wings.

Almost 33% of all known species on the planet.


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Hymenoptera (ants, bees, wasps, others) wings.

Evolution of extreme examples of social systems


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Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) wings.

Important pollinators, night and day.


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Ecdysozoa wings.

Others

Nematoda

Arthropoda

Others

Platyhelminthes

Mollusca

Annelida

Lophotrochozoa


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Choanoflagella wings.

Porifora

Placozoa

Ctenophora

Cnidaria

Protostomia

Pterobranchia

Echinodermata

Hemichordata

Chordata

Animalia


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