applied anthropometry

applied anthropometry PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 350 Views
  • Updated On :
  • Presentation posted in: General

Topics of Discussion. OverviewLearning OutcomesDefinition and key conceptsTheory and LimitationsApplying Anthropometric DataExplanation of Group ProjectsBreak into Groups to Complete ProjectsGroup Presentations (Teach your Classmates)Questions and AnswersTime to work in your groups. Learning Outcomes.

Download Presentation

applied anthropometry

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


1. Applied Anthropometry The study of human body dimensions and related properties Timeline: 1. Lecture & Resource Handouts 00:20-00:33 2.Intro, overview, learning outcomes 00:33-00:35 3.Definition & class participation in examples00:36-00:39 4. Static anthropometric measurements 00:39-00:43 5. Dynamic anthropometric measurements 00:43-00:47 6. Human variability and data models 00:47-00:55 7. Steps to apply anthropometric data & introduce group projects with student questions/clarifications 00:55-00:00 8. Break into groups-pass out instructional handouts 00:00-00:25 9. Student presentations 00:25-00:45 (7 groups X 2 min 45 sec/group) 10. Review, questions, and wrap-up. Materials List: Student Handouts Tape measures, yardsticks, calipers Kitchen style timer for group presentations 7 group projects with instructional handouts On the whiteboard-metric to inch conversions and comparison data 7 calculators (I have 3)Timeline: 1. Lecture & Resource Handouts 00:20-00:33 2.Intro, overview, learning outcomes 00:33-00:35 3.Definition & class participation in examples00:36-00:39 4. Static anthropometric measurements 00:39-00:43 5. Dynamic anthropometric measurements 00:43-00:47 6. Human variability and data models 00:47-00:55 7. Steps to apply anthropometric data & introduce group projects with student questions/clarifications 00:55-00:00 8. Break into groups-pass out instructional handouts 00:00-00:25 9. Student presentations 00:25-00:45 (7 groups X 2 min 45 sec/group) 10. Review, questions, and wrap-up. Materials List: Student Handouts Tape measures, yardsticks, calipers Kitchen style timer for group presentations 7 group projects with instructional handouts On the whiteboard-metric to inch conversions and comparison data 7 calculators (I have 3)

3. Learning Outcomes Students will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of basic anthropometry theory and cite 5 real world applications. Students will be aware of the need to design for the extremes, for an adjustable range, and for the average. Students will demonstrate beginning skills to define appropriate applications of data and calculate necessary data for a presentation.

4. Definition Anthropometry is the study of human body dimensions. Also body volumes, masses of body segments, center of gravity, and inertial properties. Anthropometry is applied to the design of consumer products, work and other places, and equipment. Adapted from Sanders & McCormick (1993) Longhistory…Marco Polo, etc. Anthropometry is *simply* defined as the study of human body dimensions. Also includes….but our focus will be on body dimensions *Ergonomics or human factors (~synonymous)* is the application of anthropometrics and biomechanics to analyze strain/stress on the body Give a few examples and ask class for moreLonghistory…Marco Polo, etc. Anthropometry is *simply* defined as the study of human body dimensions. Also includes….but our focus will be on body dimensions *Ergonomics or human factors (~synonymous)* is the application of anthropometrics and biomechanics to analyze strain/stress on the body Give a few examples and ask class for more

5. Body Postures

6. Static Anthropometric Measurements Static = Fixed or not moving Between joint centers Examples Body lengths and contours Examples Measuring tools: Laser (computer), measuring tape, calipers Resource Examples: NASA Anthropometric Source Book, Dr. J.T. McConville Anthropology Research Project (Yellow Springs) , United Nations Metric System Important data but…reach forward with long sleeve shirt…. Examples of joint centers: Elbow to knuckle, hip to ankle. Give a landmark example e.g. top of shoulder to elbow or foot bottom to eye. Pants design example (iliac crest to the lateral malleolus…make simple) Examples of body lengths and contours: Head circumference, etc. Go over all of the important body measurements…tell them on handout Show data books on table (from the library) Note that more resources listed in handouts OVERHEAD: YELLOW SPRINGS ANTHRO. RSCH. PROJECT GIVE SPECIFIC DATA EXAMPLES e.g. stature, female 95th = 171.3cm =~5’7.4 in.”. E.g. politeal height, male 5th =39.2 cm.=15.4 in. = Metric System Important data but…reach forward with long sleeve shirt…. Examples of joint centers: Elbow to knuckle, hip to ankle. Give a landmark example e.g. top of shoulder to elbow or foot bottom to eye. Pants design example (iliac crest to the lateral malleolus…make simple) Examples of body lengths and contours: Head circumference, etc. Go over all of the important body measurements…tell them on handout Show data books on table (from the library) Note that more resources listed in handouts OVERHEAD: YELLOW SPRINGS ANTHRO. RSCH. PROJECT GIVE SPECIFIC DATA EXAMPLES e.g. stature, female 95th = 171.3cm =~5’7.4 in.”. E.g. politeal height, male 5th =39.2 cm.=15.4 in. =

7. Dynamic Anthropometric Measurements Dynamic = Functional or with movement No exact conversions for static to dynamic Kromer (1983) offers some rough estimates for converting static to dynamic e.g. Reduce height (stature, eye, shoulder, hip, etc.) by 3%. Somatography e.g. A CAD program named SAMMIE e.g. A virtual reality program named dv/Maniken Scale model mock-up Explain that with movement…measuring is often performed at a frozen segment or in a range. Introduce concept of a movement envelope. More Kromer: Elbow=no change or increase 5% if elevated at work. Knee or popliteal=no change except for heels Forward/lateral reach: decrease envelope by 30% for covenience and increase envelope by 20% for extensive shoulder & trunk motions. The newest virtual reality tools help compensate for population differences in a way that printed data interpretation cannot. Note laser and the work of the Yellwstone anthropology project. OVERHEAD: SCALE MODEL MOCKUPExplain that with movement…measuring is often performed at a frozen segment or in a range. Introduce concept of a movement envelope. More Kromer: Elbow=no change or increase 5% if elevated at work. Knee or popliteal=no change except for heels Forward/lateral reach: decrease envelope by 30% for covenience and increase envelope by 20% for extensive shoulder & trunk motions. The newest virtual reality tools help compensate for population differences in a way that printed data interpretation cannot. Note laser and the work of the Yellwstone anthropology project. OVERHEAD: SCALE MODEL MOCKUP

8. Dynamic Anthropometric Measurements, continued Envelopes Work, walking, turning, bending. boundaries, etc. Graphic depiction of envelopes Examples Show 3 examples of graphically depicted work envelopes from the text Remind class of Kelly (last name?)- visiting lecturer from Boeing who spoke about work envelopes in terms of maintenance on the unmanned jet fightersShow 3 examples of graphically depicted work envelopes from the text Remind class of Kelly (last name?)- visiting lecturer from Boeing who spoke about work envelopes in terms of maintenance on the unmanned jet fighters

9. Human Variability Myth of the average human does not exist Human Variability age, sex, societal, daily changes, generational changes, ethnicity Myth: No average human. E.g. 5th percentile female measurements added together was 15.5cm or 6 in. shorter than the 5th percentile female stature data. 95th Northern European male and the 5% Japanese female as reference points.Myth: No average human. E.g. 5th percentile female measurements added together was 15.5cm or 6 in. shorter than the 5th percentile female stature data. 95th Northern European male and the 5% Japanese female as reference points.

10. Design Principles Designing for extreme individuals Design for the maximum population value when a maximum value must accommodate almost everyone. E.g. Doorways, escape apparatus, ladders, etc. This value is commonly the 95th percentile male for the target population. Design for the minimum population value when a minimum value must accommodate almost everyone. E.g. Control panel buttons and the forces to operate them. This value is commonly the 5th percentile female for the target population. (continued ) Target population: Is your target population the Seattle Sonics, the Seattle populace, or a product your company will market in Tokyo?Target population: Is your target population the Seattle Sonics, the Seattle populace, or a product your company will market in Tokyo?

11. Design Principles, continued Designing for an Adjustable Range Designing for the 5th female/95th male of the target population will accommodate 95% of the population. 95% because of the overlap in female/male body dimensions (if the male/female ratio is 50/50). Examples are auto seats, stocking hats Designing for the Average Use where adjustability is impractical, e.g. auto steering wheel, supermarket check-out counter, etc. Where the design is non-critical, e.g. door knob, snack machine, etc. Elicit examples from the classElicit examples from the class

12. Designing for Motion Select the major body joints involved Adjust your measured body dimensions to real world conditions e.g. relaxed standing/sitting postures, shoes, clothing, hand tool reach, forward bend, etc. Select appropriate motion ranges in the body joints, e.g. knee angle between 60-105 degrees, or as a motion envelope. Avoid twisting, forward bending, prolonged static postures, and holding the arms raised. Karl H.E. Kromer, Virgina Tech, from The Occupational Ergonomics Handbook ADJUST...Show overhead of Table 9.3 SELECT…show overhead table 9.12 Car seat example Goniometer?ADJUST...Show overhead of Table 9.3 SELECT…show overhead table 9.12 Car seat example Goniometer?

13. 7 Steps to Apply Anthropometric Data Identify important dimensions, e.g. hip breadth for a chair seat. Identify user population, e.g. children, women, U.S. population, world population, etc. Determine principles to use (e.g. extremes, average, adjustable) Select the range to accommodate, e.g any%, 90%, 95% Find the relevant data, e.g. from anthropometric data tables. Make modifications, e.g. adult heavy clothing adds ~4-6 linear inches. Test critical dimensions with a mock-up, user testing, or a virtual model. (Sanders & McCormick 1993) Leave this slide on the overhead and SHIFT INTTO BRIEFLY EXPLAINING EACH PROJECT AND THE PRINCIPLES INVOLVED. REASSURE STUDENTS THAT THEY HAVE DETAILED HANDOUTS WITH STEP BY STEP INSTRUCTONS. Groups have 20-25 min. to complete projects and a very short time (2.75 min.) to present. Reinforce short, succinct presentations. Use timer. Reiterate the 7 steps After this break into groups Group presentations: 3 min./group. Kitchen timer (I have). Leave this slide on the overhead and SHIFT INTTO BRIEFLY EXPLAINING EACH PROJECT AND THE PRINCIPLES INVOLVED. REASSURE STUDENTS THAT THEY HAVE DETAILED HANDOUTS WITH STEP BY STEP INSTRUCTONS. Groups have 20-25 min. to complete projects and a very short time (2.75 min.) to present. Reinforce short, succinct presentations. Use timer. Reiterate the 7 steps After this break into groups Group presentations: 3 min./group. Kitchen timer (I have).

14. Resource List…In your handouts Sanders and McCormick, 7th Ed., McGraw-Hill, Inc. 1993. Chapter 13 (Data Tables), Chapter 22 PP. 744. (CAD-SAMMIE CAD, LTD., 1987). Anthropometric Source Book, Part II: A Handbook of Anthropometric Data, National Aeronautics and Space Administration,1978. Article: Human-centric Design - Human-centric Design Advances in manikin software are enabling engineers to consider a fuller spectrum of user interactions with virtual products. By Mark Morrissey It has been 15 years since "Sammie"a computer model of a human, or manikin emerged...--http://www.memagazine.org/contents/current/features/centr... 30-Jan-2000 Note: This article discusses virtual reality in anthropometric measurement. ANTHROPOMETRY FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES - (file size - 62K) ANTHROPOMETRY FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES: NEEDS FOR THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY Task 2: Analysis and Recommendations prepared for U.S. Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board Suite 1000 1331 F. Street Washington.--http://www.access-board.gov/pubs/anthro. 30-Jan-2000 Physical Characteristics of Children - Physical Characteristics of Children As Related to Death and Injury for Consumer Product Design and Use UM-HSRI-BI-75-5 Final Report Contract FDA-72-70 May 1975 PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CHILDREN AS RELATED TO DEATH & INJURY FOR CONSUMER PRODUCT..--http://www.itl.nist.gov/div894/ovrt/projects/anthrokids/c 30-Jan-2000

  • Login