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Vision Statement PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Vision Statement Our vision is to create a computer recycling business that is economically viable, environmentally progressive, and a positive presence in the communities that we serve . Executive Summary Problem

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Vision statement l.jpg

Vision Statement

Our vision is to create a computer

recycling business that is economically viable, environmentally progressive,

and a positive presence in the

communities that we serve.


Executive summary l.jpg

Executive Summary

  • Problem

    • 500 million PCs will become obsolete from now until 2007. (National Recycling Coalition)

  • Solution

    • Reuse, reduce, and recycle.

    • Numerous conveniently located drop-off facilities.

    • Work with designers, Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition.

  • Opportunity

    • Availability of the out-of-use PC.

    • Support the community through various activities.

    • Reducing waste, saving landfill.

    • Partnership with other businesses.


  • Executive summary4 l.jpg

    Executive Summary

    • Financial

      • Handling of monitors

      • The storefront repair businesses at four locations

      • Recycling of the CPUs et al.

      • Resale of the refurbished computers

    Financial Prospective

    Capital Cost of the Plant

    (FCI

    )

    $ 772,620

    L

    Working Capital (0.20*FCI)

    $ 154,524

    Project Life (years)

    10

    Sales Revenue per year

    $ 2,380,258

    Cost of Manufacture per year

    $ 2,009,994

    Profit Per Year

    $ 370,264


    Industry overview l.jpg

    Industry Overview

    • Insufficient information on recycling and reuse industries.

      • Difficulty in specification and evaluation of new business opportunities

  • Recycling industries due to consumer or regulatory pressure.

    • No benefit from favorable economics at first.

  • General challenges

    • An overall reduction in the cost of recycling (in particular, hand separation of components).

    • Shipment of large number of the obsolete and environmentally dangerous parts.

    • Lack of of organized collection and of design of recycling, and poor marketability.


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    Current Recycling

    • Processes

      • Labor intensive

      • Can be more expensive than the revenue from the retrieved material.

  • Computers and parts

    • Donated or sold for low fee to public, low-income people and schools.

    • For unusable monitors there is recycling charge of $10-50.

    • Precious and base metals are extracted

    • Remaining components can be shredded and sampled for value and sent to a smelter for final refining.


  • Sales strategy l.jpg

    Sales Strategy

    • Service to the communities

      • Low-cost convenient recycling.

      • Low-cost refurbished computer sales.

      • Convenient computer repair (for any type of PC).

      • Various community out-reach programs

      • Education of the public

  • Integration of computer repair companies and recycling facilities.

  • Collaboration with other computer recycling companies.

  • Collaboration with computer designers.


  • Target market l.jpg

    Target Market

    • Seattle area

      • Small businesses

      • Family/individual consumers

    Are you aware of computer recycling

    programs?

    No(%)

    Yes (%)

    86%

    14%


    Organization l.jpg

    Organization

    Everett

    U-District

    Primary

    Bellevue

    Tacoma


    Satellite facilities l.jpg

    Satellite Facilities

    • Located in commercial malls unlike other companies

    • Will repair and sell refurbished parts, and systems

    • Disassemble and presort computer parts

    • Placement depending on demographics


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    Primary Facility

    • South Seattle warehouse location

    • Shredder, grinder, dust collection, flotation and jig separators

    • 61,000lb per month of computer material

    • 6,000 sq. ft. of space


    Management organization l.jpg

    Management Organization

    • Sheri Moore

      • CFO, President, Primary Facility Manager

    • Krystyna Szul

      • Marketing Officer, Bellevue Manager

    • Darby Kozak

      • Chief Engineer, Tacoma Manager

    • Sang Lee

      • Operations Manager, Everett and U-District Manager


    Operations l.jpg

    Operations

    • Around 23 full time and part time employees

    • Primary facility manager works full time

    • Satellite facility managers work part time to save money

    • One full time driver to transport computer parts as needed


    Potential circuit board value l.jpg

    Potential Circuit Board Value


    Equipment used shredders grinders l.jpg

    Shredder

    Cuts material down to 1/2 inch squares

    Can process up to 2000 lb/hr

    Ball Grinder

    Grinds material from 1/2 inch squares into fine powder.

    Can process up to 1000 lb/hr

    Equipment UsedShredders & Grinders


    Equipment used floatation jig separation l.jpg

    Denver 3-cell floatation separation unit

    Separates of hydrophobic and high surface potential particles.

    Polymers and Sulfides separates to the top of the tank.

    300 gallons/hr capacity

    24’ by 24’ Simplex Jig

    Separates material based on density.

    Heavy metals separated from silica slurry

    300 gallons/ hr capacity

    Equipment Used Floatation & Jig Separation


    Material flow chart l.jpg

    Material Flow Chart


    Revenue per year l.jpg

    Revenue Per Year


    Cost of manufacture c om per year l.jpg

    Cost of Manufacture (COM) per Year


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    Financial Overview


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    Cumulative Cash Flow


    Contacts and machinery sources l.jpg

    Contacts and Machinery Sources

    • Behr Metals, Inc. 1100 Seminary Street. Rockford, Illinois. 815-987-2750

    • Halmark Refining. Mount Vernon, WA. Contact: Anthony Senff.

    • Krieger Tile. 1236 N.E. 103rd Street. Seattle, WA 98125. Contact: James Krieger.

    • Reliable Resins Company. 6973 RidgeManor Avenue. San Diego California. USA 92120. Contact: Lee Loventhal, Tel. (619) 287-0096

    • Seattle Public Utilities. 710 Second Avenue. Seattle, WA 98104. Contact: Shirli M. Axelrod

    • Total Reclaim. BOX 24996. Seattle, WA. 98124. Contact: Craig Lorch.

    • http://www.moenbuilders.com


    References l.jpg

    References

    • Background Articles

  • Arrandale, Tom. “Recycling’s Reality Check.” Environment www.governing.com. October 2000.

  • Colby, Richard. “Nonprofit gives old computers new life.” The Oregonian.

  • Hileman, Bette. “EU Wants Electronics and Electrical Products Recycled.” C&EN. July 10, 2000.

  • Jung, Leah. Bartel, Thomas. “Computer Take-Back and Recycling an Economic Analysis for Used Consumer Equipment.” Journal of Electronics Manufacturing. World Scientific Publishing Company. Vol. 9. No. 1. March 1999.

  • Maxwell, Trevor. “Old computers now today’s waste problem.” The Oregonian. August 6, 2000.

  • Nevala, Amy. “Bring’em in Alive.” Seattle Post Intellegencer. May 2000.

  • Rose, Catherine M. Ishii, Kosuke. “Product End-of-Life Strategy Categorization Design Tool.” Journal of Electronics Manufacturing. World Scientific Publishing Company. Vol. 9. No. 2. April 1999.


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    References

    • Background Articles

  • Schuessler, Heidi. “Circuits All Used Up with Someplace to Go.” New York Times. November 23, 2000.

  • Turton. Bailie. Whiting. Shaeiwitz. Analysis, Synthesis, and Design of Chemical Process. Prentice Hall International. New Jersey. 1998.

  • Veerakamolmal, Pitipong. Gupta, Surenra M. “Analysis of Design Efficiency for the Disassembly of Modular Electronic Products.” Journal of Electronics Manufacturing. World Scientific Publishing Company. Vol. 9. No. 1. March 1999.

  • Viswanathan, S. Dr. Allada, V. “A Framework for the Flexible Grouping of Products for Disassembly” Journal of Electronics Manufacturing. World Scientific Publishing Company. Vol. 9. No. 2. April 1999.

  • Zhou, Meng. Caudill, Reggie J. Sebastian, Donald. “Multi-lifecycle product recovery for electronic products.” Journal of Electronics Manufacturing. World Scientific Publishing Company. Vol. 9. No. 1. March 1999.


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