Nouns and pronouns
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Nouns and Pronouns! PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Nouns and Pronouns!. Make sure you are ready to take good notes!!!. Nouns. A noun is the name of a person, place, or thing. Nouns name things that can be seen and touched as well as those that can not be seen and touched. Examples. Exercise A.

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Nouns and Pronouns!

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Nouns and pronouns

Nouns and Pronouns!

Make sure you are ready to take good notes!!!


Nouns

Nouns

  • A noun is the name of a person, place, or thing.

  • Nouns name things that can be seen and touched as well as those that can not be seen and touched.


Examples

Examples


Exercise a

Exercise A

  • Write the two nouns in each group. Then label each pair as people, places, or things.

  • able, baby, musician

  • rabbit, really, chair

  • prison, mountainside, write

  • misery, rusty, success

  • only, forest, swamp


Exercise a continued

Exercise A; continued

  • sailor, tiny, explorer

  • tame, table, dog

  • destroy, dentist, mayor

  • rock, clever, pie

  • beach, pasture, foolish

  • carry, courage, freedom

  • lion, kindly, kite

  • conductor, woman, do


Exercise a continued1

Exercise A; continued

  • grim, king, president

  • bedroom, school, rough

  • jolly, desk, thought

  • construction, pain, pretty

  • hunter, nurse, into

  • pelican, shouted, honor

  • pizza, library, ill


Compound nouns

Compound Nouns

  • A compound noun is a noun that is made up of more than one word.

  • Compound nouns can be:

    • Separated - bubble bath, station wagon

    • Hyphenated - son-in-law, hand-me-down

    • Combined - shipwreck, handstand


Exercise b

Exercise B

  • Read the paragraphs on the next slide and write down all the compound nouns you see.


Nouns and pronouns

As soon as she arrived at the airport, Jane became excited about her first flight alone. Once the ticket agent had given her a boarding pass, she kissed her parents, went on board, and fastened her seatbelt. Shortly after takeoff, the flight attendant brought her a soft drink. Later the passengers lunched on meatloaf, string beans, and fruit salad. Soon she heard the landing gear come down and returned her tray-table to its correct position. In a few minutes, she felt the gentle bump of touch-down.

Inside the terminal, next to the runway, her grandmother and grandfather were waiting for her. A slight mix-up over her suitcase was soon solved. With the help of a porter, they carried the luggage to the station wagon. Jane couldn’t believe her luck as she watched the beautiful scenery along the freeway on the way into town.


Nouns and pronouns

As soon as she arrived at the airport, Jane became excited about her first flight alone. Once the ticket agent had given her a boarding pass, she kissed her parents, went on board, and fastened her seatbelt. Shortly after takeoff, the flight attendant brought her a soft drink. Later the passengers lunched on meatloaf, string beans, and fruit salad. Soon she heard the landing gear come down and returned her tray-table to its correct position. In a few minutes, she felt the gentle bump of touch-down.

Inside the terminal, next to the runway, her grandmother and grandfather were waiting for her. A slight mix-up over her suitcase was soon solved. With the help of a porter, they carried the luggage to the station wagon. Jane couldn’t believe her luck as she watched the beautiful scenery along the freeway on the way into town.


Common nouns

Common Nouns

  • A common noun names any one of a class of people, places, or things.

  • Examples:

    • country

    • building

    • school

    • writer


Proper nouns

Proper Nouns

  • A proper noun names a specific person, place, or thing.

  • Examples:

    • Kenya

    • White House

    • Waverly High School

    • Emily Dickinson

    • Orlando Bloom


Exercise c

Exercise C

  • Write the proper noun in each group. Add the necessary capitalization.

  • town, village, smithville

  • black beauty, horse, pony

  • state, region, texas

  • river, nile, stream

  • landmark, memorial, washington monument


Exercise c continued

Exercise C; continued

  • whitman, poet, writer

  • french, people, language

  • dog, puppy, lassie

  • paris, capital, city

  • country, nation, italy


Exercise d

Exercise D

  • Write sentences that fit the following criteria:

  • Write a sentence about sports that includes one proper noun and one compound noun.

  • Write a sentence about animals that includes two common nouns.

  • Write a sentence about an interesting place that includes one compound proper noun and one proper noun.

  • Write a sentence about your school that contains one compound proper noun and one proper noun.

  • Write a sentence about music that includes one compound proper noun and two common nouns.


Nouns and pronouns

STOP!!!

Review the different types of nouns with a partner.


Pronouns

Pronouns

  • Pronouns are words that stand for nouns or words that take the place of nouns.

  • Pronouns have antecedents

  • An antecedent is a noun for which a pronoun stands.

  • In other words, antecedents are nouns that pronouns replace.


Examples1

Examples

  • Joe ate his whole pepperoni pizza!

  • Joe ate his whole pepperoni pizza!

  • When Angie moved, she gave her cat to the neighbors.

  • When Angie moved, she gave her cat to the neighbors.

  • Caring for bees can be rewarding, but it requires a certain amount of bravery.

  • Caring for bees can be rewarding, but it requires a certain amount of bravery.


More examples

More Examples

  • Because of its climate, Phoenix is my favorite city.

  • Because of its climate, Phoenix is my favorite city.

  • All of my answers are correct.

  • All of my answers are correct.


Exercise a1

Exercise A

  • Write the antecedent of each underlined pronoun.

  • Some of the children are afraid of mice.

  • Andrea usually brings her lunch to school.

  • This is not the record I ordered.

  • The horse has broken out of its stall.

  • Frank asked his father to help build a fire.

  • The explorers loaded supplies into their boat.

  • The Smiths enjoyed themselves at the picnic.

  • Did Joe bring his camera?

  • The boat with the red sail is the one that won.

  • The twins ordered milkshakes with their lunches.


Personal pronouns

Personal Pronouns

  • Personal pronouns refer to:

    • The person speaking

    • The person spoken to

    • The person, place, or thing spoken about.


Personal pronoun

Personal Pronoun


Exercise b1

Exercise B

  • Write each sentence underlining the two personal pronouns in each. Then draw a line from each personal pronoun to its antecedent.

  • Alice asked Henry if he had brought his bike.

  • Paul baked his parents a cake for their party.

  • The twins took their skis with them.

  • Jody put down her pencil when she was finished.

  • Dad helped the Grants select their new piano and move it into the house.

  • The fans rose to their feet when they realized the ball had gone over the fence.


Exercise b continued

Exercise B; continued

  • The movie doesn’t live up to its ads, but it does have an exciting ending.

  • Tracy enjoyed her trip and was sorry it was over.

  • Ned decided he would order cake since it looked so delicious.

  • Ellen helped her brother finish his algebra homework.


Pronouns with self or selves

Pronouns with -self or -selves

  • Pronouns that end with -self or -selves come in two categories:

    • Reflexive

      or

    • Intensive


Reflexive intensive pronouns

Reflexive & Intensive Pronouns


Reflexive vs intensive

Reflexive Pronouns

Add information to the sentence by pointing back to a noun or pronoun earlier in the sentence.

Example:

Joy helped herself to some pizza.

Intensive Pronouns

Simply adds emphasis to a noun or pronoun in the same sentence.

Example:

The mayor herself attended the meeting.

Reflexive vs. Intensive


Exercise c1

Exercise C

  • Write the reflexive or intensive pronoun in each sentence and label each as Int. (intensive) or Ref. (reflexive).

  • I myself have never questioned Jane’s loyalty.

  • We all enjoyed ourselves at the picnic.

  • The author described the plot to us herself.

  • Helen wallpapered her bedroom herself.

  • The governor himself answered our questions.

  • Paul kept telling himself he wasn’t afraid.

  • The children went to the park by themselves.


Exercise c continued1

Exercise C; continued

  • The guests helped themselves from heaping platters.

  • Pete had a hard time defending himself.

  • Rita found herself the only one left.


Demonstrative relative and interrogative

Demonstrative, Relative, and Interrogative

  • Demonstrative pronouns direct attention to specific people, places, or things.

  • Relative pronouns begin subordinate clauses and connect them to another idea in the sentence.

  • Interrogative pronouns begin questions.


Demonstrative relative and interrogative1

Demonstrative, Relative, and Interrogative


Exercise d1

Exercise D

  • Write the pronoun in each sentence. Then label each as demonstrative, relative, or interrogative.

  • Which of the candidates is more likely to win?

  • Ralph was the person who told Lisa.

  • What will happen next?

  • This book is by the same author.

  • Who was elected to represent the class?

  • Jake has a pen pal who lives in New Guinea.

  • Is that the jacket with the broken zipper?

  • What is Paul having for dinner?

  • Darryl’s aunt is the lawyer who won the case.

  • These are the tomatoes from Mom’s garden.


Indefinite pronouns

Indefinite Pronouns

  • Indefinite pronouns refer to people, places, or things, often without specifying which ones.


Indefinite pronouns1

Indefinite Pronouns


Exercise e

Exercise E

  • Write the indefinite pronouns in the paragraph.

  • Although animals throughout the animal kingdom are adaptable, none have shown greater ability to adapt than insects. Everyone knows that insects thrive in hot and humid jungle regions, but did you know that some also live in frozen polar regions? Deserts, caves, lakes, and mountains provide homes for still others. Few, however, are found in the earth’s oceans. Scientists have already identified more of these small creatures than the average person would guess - over 800,000 kinds.


Exercise e continued

Exercise E; continued

  • Write the indefinite pronouns in the paragraph.

  • No one is sure, but it seems likely that many remain to be discovered. Some of the scientists who study insects estimate that there may be up to ten million kinds still to be identified. All have up to six legs, three main body parts, and an external skeleton. One has a wingspan of about ten inches; another about one-hundredth of an inch. Their great numbers and variety seem to have equipped insects with the ability to survive anything.


Nouns and pronouns

  • Although animals throughout the animal kingdom are adaptable, none have shown greater ability to adapt than insects. Everyone knows that insects thrive in hot and humid jungle regions, but did you know that some also live in frozen polar regions? Deserts, caves, lakes, and mountains provide homes for still others. Few, however, are found in the earth’s oceans. Scientists have already identified more of these small creatures than the average person would guess - over 800,000 kinds.


Nouns and pronouns

  • No one is sure, but it seems likely that many remain to be discovered. Some of the scientists who study insects estimate that there may be up to ten million kinds still to be identified. All have up to six legs, three main body parts, and an external skeleton. One has a wingspan of about ten inches; another about one-hundredth of an inch. Their great numbers and variety seem to have equipped insects with the ability to survive anything.


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