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Data Communication and Networks. Lecture 1 Introduction and Overview September 9, 2004 Joseph Conron Computer Science Department New York University [email protected] Our goal: get “feel” and terminology more depth, detail later in course approach: use Internet as example.

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Data Communication and Networks

Lecture 1

Introduction and Overview

September 9, 2004

Joseph Conron

Computer Science Department

New York University

[email protected]

Introduction


Our goal:

get “feel” and terminology

more depth, detail later in course

approach:

use Internet as example

Overview:

what’s the Internet

what’s a protocol?

network edge

network core

Internet/ISP structure

performance: loss, delay

protocol layers, service models

network modeling

Chapter 1: Introduction

Introduction


Chapter 1: roadmap

1.1 What is the Internet?

1.2 Network edge

1.3 Network core

1.4 Internet structure and ISPs

1.5 Delay & loss in packet-switched networks

1.6 Protocol layers, service models

1.7 History

Introduction


millions of connected computing devices: hosts = end systems

running network apps

communication links

fiber, copper, radio, satellite

transmission rate = bandwidth

routers: forward packets (chunks of data)

router

workstation

server

mobile

local ISP

regional ISP

company

network

What’s the Internet: “nuts and bolts” view

Introduction


protocolscontrol sending, receiving of msgs

e.g., TCP, IP, HTTP, FTP, PPP

Internet: “network of networks”

loosely hierarchical

public Internet versus private intranet

Internet standards

RFC: Request for comments

IETF: Internet Engineering Task Force

What’s the Internet: “nuts and bolts” view

router

workstation

server

mobile

local ISP

regional ISP

company

network

Introduction


communication infrastructure enables distributed applications:

Web, email, games, e-commerce, file sharing

communication services provided to apps:

Connectionless unreliable

connection-oriented reliable

What’s the Internet: a service view

Introduction


human protocols:

“what’s the time?”

“I have a question”

introductions

… specific msgs sent

… specific actions taken when msgs received, or other events

network protocols:

machines rather than humans

all communication activity in Internet governed by protocols

What’s a protocol?

protocols define format, order of msgs sent and received among network entities, and actions taken on msg transmission, receipt

Introduction


a human protocol and a computer network protocol:

TCP connection

response

Get http://www.awl.com/kurose-ross

Got the

time?

2:00

<file>

time

What’s a protocol?

Hi

TCP connection

req

Hi

Q: Other human protocols?

Introduction


Protocol Specification

  • As designers, we can specify a protocol using

    • Space-Time Diagrams

    • Transition Diagrams

  • We can implement a protocol with a Finite State Machine (FSM)

  • Internet Protocols are formalized by RFCs which are administered by IETF

Introduction


Space-Time Diagrams

  • Defines causal ordering

  • Defines indication/request/response actions

Introduction


Transition Diagram

  • Illustrates

    • States

    • Input (the event that causes transition)

    • Transitions (to new states)

Introduction


Chapter 1: roadmap

1.1 What is the Internet?

1.2 Network edge

1.3 Network core

1.4 Internet structure and ISPs

1.6 Delay & loss in packet-switched networks

1.6 Protocol layers, service models

1.7 History

Introduction


network edge: applications and hosts

network core:

routers

network of networks

access networks, physical media: communication links

A closer look at network structure:

Introduction


end systems (hosts):

run application programs

e.g. Web, email

at “edge of network”

client/server model

client host requests, receives service from always-on server

e.g. Web browser/server; email client/server

peer-peer model:

minimal (or no) use of dedicated servers

e.g. Gnutella, KaZaA

The network edge:

Introduction


Goal: data transfer between end systems

handshaking: setup (prepare for) data transfer ahead of time

Hello, hello back human protocol

set up “state” in two communicating hosts

TCP - Transmission Control Protocol

Internet’s connection-oriented service

TCP service[RFC 793]

reliable, in-order byte-stream data transfer

loss: acknowledgements and retransmissions

flow control:

sender won’t overwhelm receiver

congestion control:

senders “slow down sending rate” when network congested

Network edge: connection-oriented service

Introduction


Goal: data transfer between end systems

same as before!

UDP - User Datagram Protocol [RFC 768]:

connectionless

unreliable data transfer

no flow control

no congestion control

App’s using TCP:

HTTP (Web), FTP (file transfer), Telnet (remote login), SMTP (email)

App’s using UDP:

streaming media, teleconferencing, DNS, Internet telephony

Network edge: connectionless service

Introduction


Chapter 1: roadmap

1.1 What is the Internet?

1.2 Network edge

1.3 Network core

1.4 Internet structure and ISPs

1.5 Delay & loss in packet-switched networks

1.6 Protocol layers, service models

1.7 History

Introduction


mesh of interconnected routers

the fundamental question: how is data transferred through net?

circuit switching: dedicated circuit per call: telephone net

packet-switching: data sent thru net in discrete “chunks”

The Network Core

Introduction


End-end resources reserved for “call”

link bandwidth, switch capacity

dedicated resources: no sharing

circuit-like (guaranteed) performance

call setup required

Network Core: Circuit Switching

Introduction


network resources (e.g., bandwidth) divided into “pieces”

pieces allocated to calls

resource piece idle if not used by owning call (no sharing)

Network Core: Circuit Switching

  • dividing link bandwidth into “pieces”

    • frequency division

    • time division

Introduction


Example:

4 users

FDM

frequency

time

TDM

frequency

time

Circuit Switching: FDM and TDM

Introduction


Numerical example

  • How long does it take to send a file of 640,000 bits from host A to host B over a circuit-switched network?

    • All links are 1.536 Mbps

    • Each link uses TDM with 24 slots

    • 500 msec to establish end-to-end circuit

      Work it out!

Introduction


each end-end data stream divided into packets

user A, B packets share network resources

each packet uses full link bandwidth

resources used as needed

Bandwidth division into “pieces”

Dedicated allocation

Resource reservation

Network Core: Packet Switching

resource contention:

  • aggregate resource demand can exceed amount available

  • congestion: packets queue, wait for link use

  • store and forward: packets move one hop at a time

    • Node receives complete packet before forwarding

Introduction


Sequence of A & B packets does not have fixed pattern  statistical multiplexing.

In TDM each host gets same slot in revolving TDM frame.

D

E

Packet Switching: Statistical Multiplexing

10 Mb/s

Ethernet

C

A

statistical multiplexing

1.5 Mb/s

B

queue of packets

waiting for output

link

Introduction


1 Mb/s link

each user:

100 kb/s when “active”

active 10% of time

circuit-switching:

10 users

packet switching:

with 35 users, probability > 10 active less than .0004

Packet switching allows more users to use network!

Packet switching versus circuit switching

N users

1 Mbps link

Introduction


Great for bursty data

resource sharing

simpler, no call setup

Excessive congestion: packet delay and loss

protocols needed for reliable data transfer, congestion control

Q: How to provide circuit-like behavior?

bandwidth guarantees needed for audio/video apps

still an unsolved problem (chapter 6)

Is packet switching a “slam dunk winner?”

Packet switching versus circuit switching

Introduction


Takes L/R seconds to transmit (push out) packet of L bits on to link or R bps

Entire packet must arrive at router before it can be transmitted on next link: store and forward

delay = 3L/R

Example:

L = 7.5 Mbits

R = 1.5 Mbps

delay = 15 sec

Packet-switching: store-and-forward

L

R

R

R

Introduction


Goal: move packets through routers from source to destination

we’ll study several path selection (i.e. routing) algorithms (chapter 4)

datagram network:

destination address in packet determines next hop

routes may change during session

analogy: driving, asking directions

virtual circuit network:

each packet carries tag (virtual circuit ID), tag determines next hop

fixed path determined at call setup time, remains fixed thru call

routers maintainper-call state

Packet-switched networks: forwarding

Introduction


Packet-switched

networks

Circuit-switched

networks

FDM

TDM

Datagram

Networks

Networks

with VCs

Network Taxonomy

Telecommunication

networks

  • Datagram network is not either connection-oriented

  • or connectionless.

  • Internet provides both connection-oriented (TCP) and

  • connectionless services (UDP) to apps.

Introduction


Chapter 1: roadmap

1.1 What is the Internet?

1.2 Network edge

1.3 Network core

1.4 Internet structure and ISPs

1.5 Delay & loss in packet-switched networks

1.6 Protocol layers, service models

1.7 History

Introduction


roughly hierarchical

at center: “tier-1” ISPs (e.g., UUNet, BBN/Genuity, Sprint, AT&T), national/international coverage

treat each other as equals

NAP

Tier-1 providers also interconnect at public network access points (NAPs)

Tier-1 providers interconnect (peer) privately

Internet structure: network of networks

Tier 1 ISP

Tier 1 ISP

Tier 1 ISP

Introduction


Tier-1 ISP: e.g., Sprint

Sprint US backbone network

Introduction


“Tier-2” ISPs: smaller (often regional) ISPs

Connect to one or more tier-1 ISPs, possibly other tier-2 ISPs

NAP

Tier-2 ISPs also peer privately with each other, interconnect at NAP

  • Tier-2 ISP pays tier-1 ISP for connectivity to rest of Internet

  • tier-2 ISP is customer of

    tier-1 provider

Tier-2 ISP

Tier-2 ISP

Tier-2 ISP

Tier-2 ISP

Tier-2 ISP

Internet structure: network of networks

Tier 1 ISP

Tier 1 ISP

Tier 1 ISP

Introduction


“Tier-3” ISPs and local ISPs

last hop (“access”) network (closest to end systems)

Tier 3

ISP

local

ISP

local

ISP

local

ISP

local

ISP

local

ISP

local

ISP

local

ISP

local

ISP

NAP

Local and tier- 3 ISPs are customers of

higher tier ISPs

connecting them to rest of Internet

Tier-2 ISP

Tier-2 ISP

Tier-2 ISP

Tier-2 ISP

Tier-2 ISP

Internet structure: network of networks

Tier 1 ISP

Tier 1 ISP

Tier 1 ISP

Introduction


a packet passes through many networks!

Tier 3

ISP

local

ISP

local

ISP

local

ISP

local

ISP

local

ISP

local

ISP

local

ISP

local

ISP

NAP

Tier-2 ISP

Tier-2 ISP

Tier-2 ISP

Tier-2 ISP

Tier-2 ISP

Internet structure: network of networks

Tier 1 ISP

Tier 1 ISP

Tier 1 ISP

Introduction


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