By Mr A. Visser Chief Director Strategic Management - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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PRESENTATION TO NCOP COMMITTEE ON SECURITY AND CONSTITUTIONAL AFFAIRS. DOD STRATEGIC BUSINESS PLAN FY05/06. By Mr A. Visser Chief Director Strategic Management. 13 April 2005 . DOD. AIM.

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PRESENTATION TO

NCOP COMMITTEE ON SECURITY AND CONSTITUTIONAL AFFAIRS

DOD STRATEGIC BUSINESS PLAN FY05/06

By

Mr A. Visser

Chief Director Strategic Management

13 April 2005

DOD


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AIM

To brief members of the NCOP Select Committee on Security and Constitutional Affairs on the DOD’s Strategic Business Plan and related issues

DOD


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SCOPE

  • Background

  • Strategic Profile of the DOD

  • Defence Outputs

  • DOD Programmes

  • Broad framework of DOD Strategic Business Plan for FY05/06 per Programme

  • Answers to Specific Questions Raised by members of Committee

  • Conclusion

  • Discussion

DOD


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BACKGROUND

  • DOD Strategic Business Plan was presented to the Portfolio Committee on Defence on 1 Feb & 15 Mar 05.

  • Tabled in Parliament on 04 April 05

  • Main focus of the DOD Plan:

    • Ending 10-years of Democracy and First Year of Second Decade of Democracy

    • Serious attempts to improve efficient, effective and economic utilisation of resources

    • Managing unfunded risks and the shortfall from the Budget (4 Options were not all funded fully funded by National Treasury

DOD


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BACKGROUND…

  • Strategic decisions (known as the Parys Resolutions) were taken in March 2004, including the Update of the White Paper on Defence and the Defence Review

  • Minister of Defence’s Strategic Guidelines

  • Defence Strategy is still in process

  • DOD deals with four Planning Cycles in any given year

DOD


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Cycles vs. Financial Years

Legend:

0 = Year of Expenditure

0-1= One Year prior to Year of Expenditure

0-2 = Two Years prior to Year of Expenditure

0+1 = One Year after Year of Expenditure


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PLANNING CYCLE - EXAMPLES


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DOD STRATEGIC PROFILE

VISION

Effective defence for a democratic South Africa

MISSION

To provide, manage, prepare and employ defence capabilities commensurate with the needs of South Africa, as regulated by the Constitution, national legislation, parliamentary and executive direction

MANDATE

The Constitution, mandates the DOD. The Defence Act, the White Paper on Defence and the Defence Review guide the execution of the defence function of the DOD.

DOD


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DEFENCE OUTPUTS

  • PRIMARY OUTPUTS

    • Defence commitments, including peace missions, joint and multinational exercises to prepare forces

    • Landward defence capabilities

    • Air defence capabilities

    • Maritime defence capabilities

    • Military health capabilities

DOD


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DEFENCE OUTPUTS…

  • SECONDARY OUTPUTS

    • Cryptographic services for Government departments

    • National Codification Bureau

    • Defence diplomacy  military attaches, memoranda of understanding, participation in international and regional defence structures such as SADC and African Union

    • International obligations  search-and-rescue, hydrography, defence-related policy advice, ministerial services.

DOD


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MINISTER’S STRATEGIC GUIDELINES – FY05/06

  • DOD to has to align itself with tasks related to promoting collective security in the region and continent, which include:

    • Prioritising Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs)

    • Sustaining current peace missions

    • Participating at multilateral organisations in such a manner that strategic positioning is achieved

    • All NEPAD projects in which the DOD is involved, must be integrated with those of the SADC region

    • SANDF to complete its phased withdrawal from internal operations in support of the SAPS by April 2009

DOD


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MINISTER’S STRATEGIC GUIDELINES ….

  • Ensuring effective, efficient and credible resource management system, including:

    • Implementing Human Resource Strategy 2010

    • Succession planning to ensure representivity

    • Sustainment of military equipment and dispose of redundant equipment, ammunition and spares

    • DOD’s information infrastructure to provide appropriate command and management information that is fully integrated with the Cabinet’s ‘Executive Information Management System’.

DOD


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MINISTER’S STRATEGIC GUIDELINES…

  • To transform the Service Corps to become a national asset outside the DOD.

  • Establish an ammunition disposal plant

  • Transformation of military legal structures must continue

  • Ensuring that the new Strategic Defence Package equipment is fully integrated and functional within the SANDF doctrine over time.

DOD


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DOD PROGRAMMES

  • Defence Administration

  • Landward Defence

  • Air Defence

  • Maritime Defence

  • Military Health Service

  • Defence Intelligence

  • Joint Support

  • Force Employment

  • Special Defence Account

DOD


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ANSWERS TO SPECIFIC QUESTIONS RAISED BY NCOP COMMITTEE TO THE DOD

DOD


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ISSUES AFFECTING PROVINCES

  • DOD is a national department conducting operations in the whole country.

  • SANDF conducts operations in support of the SAPS and other Government Departments.

  • Currently, following operations are still in place:

    • Operation INTEXO  target of 11 Regular Force Infantry companies and One engineer squadron

    • Operation STIPPER  target 23 Reserve Force Platoons

    • Operation HUMAN

DOD


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ISSUES AFFECTING PROVINCES …

  • Exercise OXIDE, which is a combined search-and-rescue exercise between France, SANDF and Department of Transport

  • Gradual withdrawal of the SANDF from routine internal deployments. In future, support will be based on intelligence and where the SAPS cannot handle the situation.

  • Borderline control to be handed back to the SAPS.

  • Phasing out of Commandos to continue and will be finalised by April 2009.

DOD


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DOD PROGRAMMES REGARDING PRESIDENT’S STATE OF NATION ADDRESS

  • DOD compiles its annual strategic planning guidelines for the Minister, the Secretary for Defence and Chief of SANDF based on:

    • Ten-Year Review priorities

    • Cabinet Makgotla minutes and Programme of Action

    • The President’s State of Nation Address

    • Minister of Finance’s Budget Speech

  • Update of the White Paper on Defence and the Defence Review in process

DOD


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DOD RESPONSIBILITIES FROM THE PROGRAMME OF ACTION AND STATE OF NATION ADDRESS

  • IRPS CLUSTER

    • Support the AU Peace and Security Council

    • Operationalise the Regional Early Warning System

    • Finalise the Common African Defence and Security Policy

    • Establish the African Standby Force

    • Review the White Paper on Peace Missions

    • Work towards SA representation in all African countries by 2007

    • Strengthen SA’s role as chair of the SADC Organ

    • Continue supporting the peace and reconstruction efforts in the DRC, Burundi, Sudan, Cote d’Ivoire and Somalia

    • Support establishment of a Joint Bilateral Co-operation Commission with Swaziland


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DOD RESPONSIBILITIES FROM THE PROGRAMME OF ACTION AND STATE OF NATION ADDRESS

  • IRPS CLUSTER…

    • As Chair of the SADC Organ, to support process for ensuring free and fair elections in Zimbabwe

    • Support the India, Brazil and South Africa (IBSA) Commission

    • Ensure ratification of and compliance with all instruments of international terrorism

    • Amend the Regulation of Foreign Military Assistance Act

    • Prevent the proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction


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DOD ACTION PLAN - 2005

IRPS ISSUES


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DOD ACTION PLAN - 2005

IRPS ISSUES …


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DOD ACTION PLAN - 2005

IRPS ISSUES …


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DOD RESPONSIBILITIES FROM THE PROGRAMME OF ACTION AND STATE OF NATION ADDRESS

  • JCPS CLUSTER

    • Establishment of the National Security Strategy

    • Strategy to improve the capacity of the intelligence community

    • Border control

    • Updating of outdated Border Control Technology

    • Implementation of an entry and exit strategy by 2009 to strengthen the security of South Africa’s border-line

    • Sea post of entry, with specific reference to non-international airports and the affordability of upgrading radar

    • Establishing an integrated plan to neutralise air threats and enhance border control and security


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DOD RESPONSIBILITIES FROM THE PROGRAMME OF ACTION AND STATE OF NATION ADDRESS

  • JCPS CLUSTER…

    • Finalise amendments to the Regulation of Foreign Military Assistance Act

    • The readiness of the SANDF, specifically with regard to an appropriate age balance

    • Secure the forthcoming local elections

    • Putting the Security Services Division (SAPS) into operation and phasing out the Commando’s


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DOD ACTION PLAN - 2005

JCPS ISSUES…


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DOD ACTION PLAN - 2005

JCPS ISSUES…


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DOD RESPONSIBILITIES FROM THE PROGRAMME OF ACTION AND STATE OF NATION ADDRESS

  • GOVERNANCE AND ADMINISTRATION (G&A) CLUSTER

    • Review of gender balances

    • Capacity assessment of major government programmes

    • Co-ordinate focused HR Management and HR Development to meet identified skills gaps

    • Improve conditions of service for selected professionals and identified skills

    • Deployment of managers within the public service and local government

    • Revitalise and improve Batho Pele requirements in performance agreements of public servants


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DOD ACTION PLAN - 2005

G&A ISSUES


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SKILLS DEVELOPMENT IN THE DOD

  • Military Skills Development System MSDS) – Introduced in January 2003 with various intakes took place in 2003, 2004 and 2005.

    • Selected youthful applicants (aged 18-23 for school-leavers and aged 26 for graduates) join the SANDF

    • Rejuvenation of the Regular and Reserve Force of the SANDF

    • Improve representivity

    • Largest intake thus far: 3 927 – Jan 05

    • Certificate in Military Studies graduate: 146 Military Academy

    • Total: 6 222 members and 10% of Regular Force

  • Youth Foundation Training Programme

    • Empower Black learners iro Maths, Science and Accountancy

    • To be appointed in the scarce combat, technical and statutory-professional occupational classes (pilots, naval combat officers, finance functionaries, medical doctors, etc).

    • Used to improve representivity in DOD

    • Since 2001, 876 participated in programme, 708 appointed in the DOD.

    • Pass rate in 2004: Maths 98%, Physical Science 99%, Biology 100%, Accountancy 100%


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SKILLS DEVELOPMENT IN THE DOD…

  • In-Service Skills Development (see the Annual Report 2003/04 Chapter 3, Table 3.36). This forms part of the members’ career path and mobility in the DOD. It covers functional training (as prescribed per mustering and corps), tertiary training (universities, Military Academy, etc) and external training opportunities.


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RECRUITMENT POLICY

  • Recruitment policy closely linked to Military Skills Development System (MSDS).

  • HR acquisition process is done in a transparent, professional, equitable, efficient manner.

  • DOD HR Acquisition Strategy has decentralised recruitment function to all Services and Divisions. The Strategy has the following end-states:

    • DOD is recognised and perceived as an empowering institution and employer of choice, offering short, medium and long-term careers. This end states provides 20 practical ways to conduct recruitment across South Africa.

    • An effective, efficient and economical selection process exists that serves to provide the most suitable candidate at the right time at the right place. Five practical ways were identified for the selection process.

    • An appointment process exists that serves to provide the most suitable candidate. Eight practical ways of improving the existing appointment process were identified.

    • Monitoring mechanisms are in place to measure effectiveness and efficiency of the HR acquisition process. Four ways of improvement were identified.


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COMBAT READINESS

PROCESS:

  • Chief of Joint Operations (CJ Ops) determines requirements for operational purposes in terms of type of equipment, quantity, level of serviceability, personnel, and many other operational specifications.

  • Chiefs of Services (Army, Air Force, Navy and SAMHS) and supporting Divisions provide forces in terms of the Provide Forces Strategy.

  • Collectively these constitute state of Combat Readiness.

  • Services and Divisions are to report regularly to the Chief of the SANDF on their ability or inability to provide specified capabilities.

  • Combat Readiness is based largely on the notice periods (time-frames) required to deploy forces.

  • For every unit deployed, one unit must prepare to deploy (relief), and the other should be in rest.

  • State of Readiness Report is compiled together with the Annual Report and presented to Parliament as may be required.


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COMBAT READINESS AND STATE OF AMMUNITION

SA Army

  • SA Army is combat ready in respect of personnel and equipment for the current missions.

  • There is still a requirement for renewal of prime mission equipment to minimise the effects of possible mass obsolescence. This affects the SA Army conventional capability.

  • Human resources still pose a challenge with regard to age and health profiles. However, these are being addressed through the MSDS.

  • Facilities remain a major concern.

  • AMMUNITION: SA Army has sufficient ammunition for reserve and deployment purposes. Old ammunition is disposed of through conventional methods.


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    COMBAT READINESS…

    • SA Air Force

      • This measured by aggregating ‘daily mission ready aircraft, crews and the availability of appropriate operational infrastructure’.

      • The Air Force is combat ready in respect of air combat capability, helicopter capability and command and control capability.

      • It is facing a challenge in respect of Air Transport Capability which provides tactical air mobility to own forces and crucial logistical link between the RSA and deployed forces in the African continent.

    • AMMUNITION: The SA Air Force has adequate ammunition in stock for deployment, force preparation and reserve. However, old ammunition is being disposed as per disposal plan and methods.


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    COMBAT READINESS…

    • SA NAVY

      • All ships are kept at a basic combat readiness level.They are give a period of time to prepare for specific missions. Thus funds are used only ships that are going to be deployed.

      • Corvettes are still part of the Project and therefore will be handed over to the Navy individually once sea trials and operational evaluation of the combat suite are complete.

      • Challenges:

        • SA Navy is to maintain current force structure while preparing to integrate new force structure elements as part of the new vessels. This places a serious financial burden on the Navy.

        • Availability of qualified and experienced seagoing personnel and various training requirements.

        • None of the Strike Craft or Mine Countermeasure Vessels can presently be deployed in their primary role.

    • AMMUNITION: SA Navy has sufficient mines in its inventory and has made provision for sufficient ammunition for all the guns in its inventory. Mines/torpedoes for the new Corvettes and submarines will be provided soon when these vessels have to become operational.


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    COMBAT READINESS…

    • SAMHS

      • The SA Military Health Service (SAMHS) is combat ready in terms of its main deployable forces.

      • However, 1 Med Bn Gp, 3 Med Bn Gp and 6 Med Bn Gp will require a longer warning period before they can get deployed. Areas of concern are personnel, prime mission equipment, sustainment of supplies and facilities.


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    CONCLUSION

    • Alignment with Government Priorities (Ten-Year Review and Cabinet Makgotla decisions, and the President’s State of Nation Address

    • Maintenance of the SANDF core capabilities

    • Strategic Defence Packages to be integrated into SANDF

    • Strategic Decisions (Parys Resolutions)

    • State of readiness of the SANDF adequate

    • State of ammunition for the SANDF adequate

    DOD


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    DISCUSSION


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