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HALLOWEEN. Main Points. Ancient Origins Evolution of a Holiday Annual Athens Celebration. The Celts. Lived in the area that is now Ireland, the United Kingdom, and Northern France. On October 31 celebrated the festival of Samhain.

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Main Points

  • Ancient Origins

  • Evolution of a Holiday

  • Annual Athens Celebration


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The Celts

  • Lived in the area that is now Ireland, the United Kingdom, and Northern France.

  • On October 31 celebrated the festival of Samhain.

  • Believed that Samhin called together the souls of all the dead people.

  • Held bonfires to make sacrifices to their gods.

The History Channel (2000). Halloween History. [World Wide Web page]. Available:

http://www.thehistorychannel.com (15 February 2001).


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Romans

  • Feralia – a day in late October in which the Romans remembered their dead.

  • Pomona – Roman god of their fruits and gardens.

  • Probably explains the tradition of “bobbing” for apples on Halloween.

Patterson, L. (1963). Halloween. Champaign, IL: Garrard Publishing Co.


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Catholic Church

  • Pope Boniface IV made November 1 All Saints’ Day in 835.

  • In 1000 the church declared that November 2 would be All Souls’ Day.

  • These holidays along with the festival of Samhain were also referred to as All-hallowmas and eventually Halloween.

The History Channel (2000). Halloween History. [World Wide Web page]. Available:

http://www.thehistorychannel.com (15 February 2001).


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Jack-O-Lantern

  • The Celts carried lights with them if they went out on October 31.

  • They believed the light protected them from evil spirits.

  • Children soon began to carve faces in the turnips.

  • When the Irish came to America they began to use pumpkins.

Patterson, L. (1963). Halloween. Champaign, IL: Garrard Publishing Co.


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Masks

  • People were afraid they would encounter ghosts if they left their house on Halloween.

  • To prevent themselves from being recognized they would wear masks outside.

  • They hoped that the ghosts would mistake them for other ghosts.

The History Channel (2000). Halloween History. [World Wide Web page]. Available:

http://www.thehistorychannel.com (15 February 2001).


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Trick-Or-Treating

  • During All Souls’ Day Parades the poor of England would beg for food.

  • People would give them pastries called soul cakes in return for prayers for dead relatives.

  • This practice was referred to as going-a-souling and was eventually picked up by children who got treats from neighbors.

The History Channel (2000). Halloween History. [World Wide Web page]. Available:

http://www.thehistorychannel.com (15 February 2001).


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Athens

  • On October 29, 1940 The Athens Kiwanis Club and the Junior Chamber of Commerce sponsored a Halloween party on Court Street.

  • In 1974 500 students blocked traffic for two hours on Court Street.

Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication. (1996). The History of the Party.

[World Wide Web page]. Available:http://www.viscom.ohiou.edu/halloween/

welcome.html (15 February 2001).


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Athens

  • In 1977 the Athens City Council and Ohio University sponsored the party. A stage was constructed on Court Street and Bob Hope entertained at the Convocation Center.

  • In 1979 both the University and city council refused to sponsor the party because of the large crowds. An illegal Court Street part was held anyways.

Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication. (1996). The History of the Party.

[World Wide Web page]. Available:http://www.viscom.ohiou.edu/halloween/

welcome.html (15 February 2001).


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Athens

  • In 1984 the Athens Clean and Safe Halloween Committee was created by 20 local businesses. The party was held in the Intramural parking lot on Court Street.

  • Court Street has since been blocked of with a stage being erected at Court and Union.

Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication. (1996). The History of the Party.

[World Wide Web page]. Available:http://www.viscom.ohiou.edu/halloween/

welcome.html (15 February 2001).


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Athens

  • The party grew too as large as 50,000 in 1993. With partygoers coming from all around the Midwest.


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Athens

  • Since than the University has tried numerous times to have the party stopped because of the amount of arrests and damage done to campus.



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