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Related Work. Mobile Games Review. Yu-Song Syu. Online Geotagging Apps. GeoTagging Flickr Google Maps Panoramio Del.icio.us GeoURL GeoHash. examples. Mobile Games. Uncle Roy All Around You. Chasing Game. CYSMN. Bystander. Savannah. Non-Task. CityPoker. GWAP. GeoTicTacToe.

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related work

Related Work

Mobile Games Review

Yu-Song Syu

online geotagging apps
Online Geotagging Apps
  • GeoTagging Flickr
  • Google Maps
  • Panoramio
  • Del.icio.us
  • GeoURL
  • GeoHash
mobile games

examples

Mobile Games

Uncle Roy All Around You

Chasing

Game

CYSMN

Bystander

Savannah

Non-Task

CityPoker

GWAP

GeoTicTacToe

Alak

CityExplorer

Location-Based

Social Games

Task

MobiMissions

Hitcher

Strategically

assigning

Feeding Yoshi

Gopher

Randomly

assigning

EyeSpy

WhozThat

Social Network Service

CenceMe

mobile games4

examples

Mobile Games

Uncle Roy All Around You

Chasing

Game

CYSMN

Bystander

Savannah

Non-Task

CityPoker

GWAP

GeoTicTacToe

Alak

CityExplorer

Location-Based

Social Games

Task

MobiMissions

Hitcher

Strategically

assigning

Feeding Yoshi

Gopher

Randomly

assigning

EyeSpy

WhozThat

Social Network Service

CenceMe

can you see me now
Can You See Me Now?
  • S. Benford, A. Crabtree, M. Flintham, A. Drozd, R. Anastasi, M. Paxton, N. Tandavanitj, M. Adams, and J. Rowfarr, Can You See Me Now?, CHI 2006
  • Like a “hide-and-seek” game
  • Runners run in the whole city
  • Players monitor runners on the screen and try to catch them
  • Besides tracking, it also collects context through talk between players
bystander
Bystander
  • M. Flinthem, R. Anastasi, S. Benford, T. Hemmings, A. Crabtree, C. Greenalgh, T. Rodden, N. Tandavanitj, M. Adams, and J. Rowfarr. Where On-Line Meets On-The-Streets: Experiences With Mobile Mixed Reality Games. CHI 2003
  • Similar to CYSMN
  • public (local) players on the street and the performers on line
  • One performer gives some clues to make the local players follow the trail of each other successfully
  • Localization: GPS
savannah
Savannah
  • educational game developed by NESTA Futurelab, Hewlett-Packard Laboratories
  • Players are “Lions,” going around the map and find virtual animals to attack
uncle roy all around you
Uncle Roy All Around You
  • Blast Theory, Uncle Roy All Around You
  • Online players and Street players collaborate to search uncle Roy in a virtual city
  • Street players go to places according to Uncle Roy’s hint, and then (after they arrive there) get a new one
  • Online Players assist Street Players by matching photos and Uncle Roy\'s comments and then passing relevant information to the Street Player
mobile games9

examples

Mobile Games

Uncle Roy All Around You

Chasing

Game

CYSMN

Bystander

Savannah

Non-Task

CityPoker

GWAP

GeoTicTacToe

Alak

CityExplorer

Location-Based

Social Games

Task

MobiMissions

Hitcher

Strategically

assigning

Feeding Yoshi

Gopher

Randomly

assigning

EyeSpy

WhozThat

Social Network Service

CenceMe

mobimissions
Mobimissions
  • L. Grant, H Daanen, S. Benford, A Hampshire, A. Drozd, and C. Greenhalgh. Mobimission: the game of missions for mobile phones. SIGGRAPH 2007
  • Abstract: Mobimissions is a location-based pervasive social game in which players use camera phones with location-based capabilities to create, share and reply to real-world missions
  • Missions are created, solved, and reviewed all by players
  • System assigns “NEARBY” missions & “location-independent” missions to players
gopher game
Gopher Game
  • S. Casey, B. Kirman and D. Rowland. The Gopher Game: A Social, Mobile, Locative Game with User Generated Content and Peer Review. ACE 2007
  • Missions are created, solved, and reviewed all by players
  • System tends to assign “NEARBY” missions
hitchers
Hitchers
  • A. Drozd, S. Benford, N. Tandavanitj, M. Writht, and A. Chamberlain. Hitchers: Designing for Cellular Positioning. Ubicomp 2006
  • “Hitchers” are created and released into the wild by players and
    • try to find their way home
    • reach a specific destination
    • carry out a mission (similar to Gopher)
      • Ex: what is good to eat near here?
    • Or just share a journey with a stranger (hitchhiking)
feeding yoshi game
Feeding Yoshi game
  • M. Bell, M. Chalmers, L. Barkhuus, M. Hall, S. Sherwood, P. Tennent, B. Brown, D. Rowland, S. Benford, A. Hampshire, M. Capra. Interweaving Mobile Games With Everyday Life. CHI 2006
  • Players travel around the city and find “Yoshis”, get seeds from them, and plant to get the fruit, feed the Yoshis and sometimes exchange fruit with other players.
city explorer
City Explorer

Choose location

Occupy Objects

Validate

  • S. Matyas. Playful Geospatial Data Acquisition by Location-based Gaming Communities, IJVR 2007
  • S. Matyas, H. Mitarai, M. Kamata. Designing Location-based Mobile Games with a Purpose – Collecting Geospatial Data with CityExplorer, ACE 2008
  • Played like a Carcassonne board game
    • The map is divided into several Regions
    • At the beginning, the whole map is “hidden”
    • Before each round, every player choose several kinds of real world objects
      • e.g. player A chooses “bar & church”; player B chooses ”garden & restaurant”
    • Players occupy objects by placing one “token” on each
      • e.g. put one token to locate one bar in the real world
    • Tokens can be only placed on locations of chosen object categories
    • At the end of each round, who holds the majority of game tokens in each Region occupy the region and gets points
city explorer cont
City Explorer (cont’)
  • No Assignment
    • Players tag according to Carcassonne rules
  • In IJVR 2007, the author also 1discusses critical elements of location-based games, provided a framework, and take GeoTicTacToe and CityPoker as case studies
eyespy
EyeSpy
  • M. Bell, S. Reeves, B. Brown, S. Sherwood, D. MacMillan, J. Ferguson, and M. Chalmers. Eyespy: Supporting Navigation through play. CHI 2009
  • “Geotagging tasks” are generated & solved by players
    • Photo tasks
    • Text tasks
  • System assign tasks to other players
    • Random assignment
  • Players solve tasks by going to the location with the cell devices
  • Generates data suitable for navigation than those from Flickr
geotictactoe
GeoTicTacToe
  • C. Schlieder, P Kiefer, and S. Matyas. Geogames: Designing Location-Based Games from Classic Board Games. IEEE Intelligent Systems 2006
  • Adopted from traditional TicTacToe game
  • Synchronization problem
    • Fast players always win (fig.1)
    • Solution: let players finish some tasks before he can go on
    • The faster the player is, the harder task he will get
  • Localization: GPS

fig. 1 tic-tac-toe with an equidistant mapping

citypoker
CityPoker

fig. 1 Starting situation in CityPoker

  • C. Schlieder. Representing the Meaning of Spatial Behavior by Spatially Grounded Intentional Systems, In: M. A. Rodríguez et al. (Eds.): Geospatial Semantics, LNCS 3799, pp. 30 – 44, Berlin: Springer, 2005.
  • CityPoker an adapted poker game
    • players start with a hand of 5 cards (fig. 1)
    • They try to improve their starting hand by changing cards at 15 locations (only 5 of which contains cards) in the real world
    • One player can change one card from the cache, and he can change form cache only once.
  • System
    • analyzes the tracks => model the behavior of players & the user intentions.
    • Then, provide intention service automatically according to the user intentions
    • e.g. display large scale map when the player intends to GetCard
  • Locolization: GPS
playing on a line alak
Playing on a Line - Alak

board game Go

  • P. Kiefer, S. Matyas, C. Schlieder. Playing on a Line: Location-based Games for Liner Trips. ACE 2007
  • Alak - Linear version of Go (黑白棋)
    • Consecutive game boards
    • Possible to adjust the length of the journey during the game
  • Played on a linear feature of given length
    • E.g. a bike trail
mobile games24

examples

Mobile Games

Uncle Roy All Around You

Chasing

Game

CYSMN

Bystander

Savannah

Non-Task

CityPoker

GWAP

GeoTicTacToe

Alak

CityExplorer

Location-Based

Social Games

Task

MobiMissions

Hitcher

Strategically

assigning

Feeding Yoshi

Gopher

Randomly

assigning

EyeSpy

WhozThat

Social Network Service

CenceMe

whozthat
WhozThat
  • A.Beach, M. Gartrell, S. Akkala, J. Elston, J. Kelley, K. Nishimoto, B. Ray, S. Razgulin, K. Sundaresan, B. Surendar, M. Terada, and R. Han. WhozThat? Evolving an Ecosystem for Context-Aware Mobile Social Networks. IEEE Network, 2008
  • Connects unfamiliar people by exchanging social data
    • i.e. habit, common friends, …
  • Discusses security and privacyissues in social networks
cenceme
CenceMe
  • E. Miluzzo, N. D. Lane, S. B. Eisenman, and A. T. Campbell. CenceMe – Injecting Sensing Presence into Social Networking Applications. EuroSSC 2007
  • Social tool to show user information and update online status (e.g. the location of the user, whether the user is talking, or ) automatically
  • Provides privacy protection
pervasive games reviewing
pervasive games reviewing
  • M. Capra, M. Radenkovic, S. Benford, L. Oppermann, A. Drozd, and M. Flintham. The multimedia challenges raised by pervasive games, MULTIMEDIA 2005
  • Reviews recent examples of pervasive games in order to explain their distinctive characteristics as multimedia applications
    • Can You See Me Now?
    • Uncle Roy All Around You
    • Savannah
  • Considers the challenge of creating future pervasive games that are both richly interactive and scalable for very large # players
    • Mobility
    • Interacting in public
    • Integrating the physical and the digital
exp with mobile mixed reality games
Exp. With Mobile Mixed Reality Games
  • M. Flinthem, R. Anastasi, S. Benford, T. Hemmings, A. Crabtree, C. Greenalgh, T. Rodden, N. Tandavanitj, M. Adams, and J. Rowfarr. Where On-Line Meets On-The-Streets: Experiences With Mobile Mixed Reality Games. CHI 2003
  • Use “Can You See Me Now” & “Bystander”
  • Abstract:
    • Show how context is more socially than technically constructed.
    • Show how players exploited multiple indications of context including GPS, GPS error, audio talk, ambient audio, timing, local knowledge and trust.
    • Recommend not overly relying on GPS, extensively using audio, and extending interfaces to represent GPS error
understanding geocaching practices and motivations
Understanding Geocaching Practices and Motivations
  • K. O’hara. Understanding Geocaching Practices and Motivations. CHI 2008
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