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Ver. 2.0. Six Facets of Understanding. Clarifying meaning and defining expectations. Chuck McWilliams, MRH School District Friday, June 5 th 2009. McWilliams, 2009. "There is nothing so terrible as activity without insight." -Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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Ver. 2.0

Six Facets of Understanding

Clarifying meaning and defining expectations

Chuck McWilliams, MRH School District

Friday, June 5th 2009

McWilliams, 2009


"There is nothing so terrible

as activity without insight."

-Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

German Playwright, Poet, Novelist and Dramatist. 1749-1832

McWilliams, 2009


Our shared thinking as ubd designers
Our Shared Thinking as UbD Designers

  • The teacher’s job is to “uncover” the big ideas contained in content standards and to ensure they are understood, not to provide merely fun activities or cover a textbook or cover a textbook’s content.

  • The job of the teacher requires “thinking like an assessor” - doing research into one’s practice, and adjusting practice and designs in light of sought-after results/feedback.

Wiggins, Grant, & McTighe, Jay. (1998). Understanding by Design. ASCD.

McWilliams, 2009


A few great thinkers

Jay McTighe

Benjamin Bloom

Grant Wiggins

Norman Webb

Depth of

Knowledge

Facets of

Understanding

Bloom’s

Taxonomy

A Few Great Thinkers!

McWilliams, 2009


Introducing

High

Knowledge

Comprehension

Application

Analysis

Synthesis

Evaluation

Benjamin Bloom

Bloom’s

Taxonomy

Low

Introducing…

McWilliams, 2009


A newer look

Knowledge

Comprehension

Application

Analysis

Synthesis

Evaluation

Remembering

Understanding

Applying

Analyzing

Evaluating

Creating

A Newer Look?

Lorin Anderson

and

David Krathwohl

Revised

Bloom’s

Taxonomy

McWilliams, 2009


Knowledge or remembering
Knowledge or Remembering

  • Observing and recalling information

  • Knowledge of dates, events, places

  • Knowledge of major ideas

  • Mastery of subject matter

  • Content knowledge!

Key Words:List, Define, Tell, Describe, Identify, Show, Label, Collect, Examine, Tabulate, Quote, Name, Who, When, Where

McWilliams, 2009


Comprehension or understanding
Comprehension or Understanding

  • Understanding information

  • Grasping meaning

  • Translating knowledge into new context

  • Interpreting facts, comparing, contrasting

  • Ordering, grouping, inferring causes

  • Predicting consequences

Key Words: Summarize, Describe, Interpret, Contrast, Predict, Associate, Distinguish, Estimate, Differentiate, Discuss, Extend

McWilliams, 2009


Application or applying
Application or Applying

  • Using information

  • Using methods, concepts, theories in new situations

  • Solving problems using required skills or knowledge

  • Carrying out a procedure that implements previously learned knowledge

Key Words: Apply, Demonstrate, Calculate, Complete, Illustrate, Show, Solve, Examine, Modify, Relate, Change, Classify, Experiment, Discover

McWilliams, 2009


Analysis or analyzing
Analysis or Analyzing

  • Seeing patterns

  • Organizing parts

  • Recognizing hidden meanings

  • Identifying components

  • “Connecting the dots”

Key Words:Analyze, Separate, Order, Explain, Connect, Classify, Arrange, Divide, Compare, Select, Explain, Infer

McWilliams, 2009


Synthesis or creating
Synthesis or Creating

  • Using old ideas to create new ones

  • Generalizing from given facts

  • Relating knowledge from several areas

  • Preparing a solution

  • Drawing conclusions

Key Words:Combine, Integrate, Modify, Rearrange, Substitute, Plan, Create, Design, Invent, What if?, Compose, Formulate, Prepare, Generalize

McWilliams, 2009


Evaluation or evaluating
Evaluation or Evaluating

  • Comparing and discriminating between ideas

  • Assessing value of theories and ideas

  • Making choices based on reasoned argument

  • Verifying the value of evidence

  • Recognizing subjectivity

Key Words:Assess, Decide, Rank, Grade, Test, Measure, Recommend, Convince, Select, Judge, Discriminate, Support, Conclude, Compare, Summarize

McWilliams, 2009


Using bloom s taxonomy in unit planning
Using Bloom’s Taxonomy in Unit Planning

  • How can Bloom’s ideas be applied in unit planning?

  • What might be some other ways to use Bloom’s taxonomy?

  • Share examples of ways you’ve used Bloom’s.

McWilliams, 2009


Introducing1

Level 4 - Extended Thinking

Level 3 - Strategic Thinking

Level 2 - Skill/Concept

Norman Webb

Depth of

Knowledge

Level 1 - Recall

Introducing…

McWilliams, 2009


Level 1 - Recall

  • Automatic recognition

  • Remembering lists/numbers

  • Recognition of concept/formula

  • Simple processes/procedures

  • Application in situations or tasks

  • Basic facts

Key Words:

Recite, Recognize, Name, Use, Illustrate, Measure, Define, Draw, List, Identify, Memorize Recall, Repeat, State, Tell

McWilliams, 2009


Dok level 1 examples
DOK Level 1 Examples

  • List animals that survive by eating other animals.

  • Identify elements of music using musical terminology.

  • Recall facts explicitly found in text.

  • Describe physical features of places.

  • Determine the perimeter or area of rectangles given a drawing or labels.

  • Identify basic rules for participating in simple games and activities.

McWilliams, 2009


Level 2 - Skills/Concepts

  • Understanding of concepts

  • Recognition of skills

  • Application of skills in new problems

  • Gather, organize, and remember data

  • Interpret simple graphics

  • Drawing proper conclusions

Key Words:

Compare, Classify, Infer, Categorize, Construct, Predict, Interpret, Relate, Estimate, Distinguish, Summarize, Show

McWilliams, 2009


Dok level 2 examples
DOK Level 2 Examples

  • Compare desert and tropical environments.

  • Identify and summarize the major events, problems, solutions, conflicts in text.

  • Explain the cause-effect of historical events.

  • Predict a logical outcome based on information in a reading selection.

  • Explain how good work habits are important at home, school, and on the job.

  • Describe various styles of music.

McWilliams, 2009


Level 3 - Strategic Thinking

  • Examine all aspects of a problem

  • Reflect on circumstances

  • Synthesize concepts for use in problem solving

  • Generate new ideas/solutions

  • Evaluate effectiveness

  • Provide rationale in decision-making

  • Justifies procedures

Key Words:

Revise, Assess, Construct, Investigate, Differentiate, Formulate, Draw Conclusions, Develop a Logical Argument, Cite Evidence, Hypothesize

McWilliams, 2009


Dok level 3 examples
DOK Level 3 Examples

  • Compare consumer actions and analyze how these actions impact the environment.

  • Analyze or evaluate the effectiveness of literary elements (e.g. characterization, setting, point of view, conflict and resolution, plot structures).

  • Solve a multiple-step problem and provide support with a mathematical explanation that justifies the answer.

McWilliams, 2009


Level 4 - Extended Thinking

  • Thinking “outside the box”

  • Expanding on ideas

  • Asking “What if…”

  • Producing a complex product

  • Interpreting different points of view without demonstrating personal bias

Key Words:

Create, Prove, Analyze, Critique, Apply Concepts, Synthesize, Connect, Design, Simulate

McWilliams, 2009


Dok level 4 examples
DOK Level 4 Examples

  • Develop a scientific model for a complex idea.

  • Propose and evaluate solutions for an economic problem.

  • Explain, generalize or connect ideas, using supporting evidence from a text or source.

  • Create a video that represents the characteristics of a culture.

McWilliams, 2009


Using the dok in unit planning
Using the DOK in Unit Planning

  • How can DOK be applied in unit planning?

  • What might be some other ways to use the DOK model?

  • Share examples of ways you’ve used DOK.

McWilliams, 2009


Hey what s the big idea

Jay McTighe

Grant Wiggins

Facets of

Understanding

Hey! What’s the Big Idea?

McWilliams, 2009


What is knowledge

Declarative Knowledge

Knowing WHAT

Procedural Knowledge

Knowing HOW

Structural Knowledge

Knowing WHY

What is knowledge?

-Jonassen, Computers as Mindtools for Schools, 2000

McWilliams, 2009


Structure of knowledge

BIG IDEAS

Structure of Knowledge

Principles

and

Generalizations

Key Concepts and Core Processes

Facts and Skills

Wiggins, Grant, & McTighe, Jay. (1998). Understanding by Design. ASCD.

McWilliams, 2009


Establishing curricular priorities

worth being

familiar with

“nice to know”

important to

know and do

foundational concepts & skills

“big ideas”

worth

understanding

enduring understandings

Establishing Curricular Priorities

Wiggins, Grant, & McTighe, Jay. (1998). Understanding by Design. ASCD.

McWilliams, 2009


How it all fits together
How It All Fits Together

McWilliams, 2009


The six facets of understanding
The Six Facets of Understanding

Superficial Coverage

vs.

Uncovering Big Ideas

Explanation

Interpretation

Application

_______

Perspective

Empathy

Self-Knowledge

Wiggins, Grant, & McTighe, Jay. (1998). Understanding by Design. ASCD.

McWilliams, 2009


Reviewing the six facets of understanding

What’s the name of this facet?

Reviewing the SIX FACETS of Understanding

  • It’s described as…

  • Telling meaningful stories

  • Offering apt translations

  • Revealing historical or personal dimension to ideas and events

  • Making the object of understanding personal

  • Why it’sInterpretation, of course!

I

Wiggins, Grant, & McTighe, Jay. (1998). Understanding by Design. ASCD.

McWilliams, 2009


Reviewing the six facets of understanding1

What’s the name of this facet?

Reviewing the SIX FACETS of Understanding

  • It’s described as…

  • Making generalizations

  • Justifying facts and data

  • Providing insightful connections, illuminating examples, and detailed illustrations

  • Why it’sExplanation, of course!

E

Wiggins, Grant, & McTighe, Jay. (1998). Understanding by Design. ASCD.

McWilliams, 2009


Reviewing the six facets of understanding2

What’s the name of this facet?

Reviewing the SIX FACETS of Understanding

  • It’s described as…

  • Effectively using knowledge

  • Adapting knowledge and skills in diverse and real contexts

  • “Doing” the subject

  • Whyit’s, of course!

A

Application

Wiggins, Grant, & McTighe, Jay. (1998). Understanding by Design. ASCD.

McWilliams, 2009


Reviewing the six facets of understanding3

What’s the name of this facet?

Reviewing the SIX FACETS of Understanding

  • It’s described as…

  • Seeing and hear points of view through critical eyes and ears

  • Seeing the “big picture”

  • Why it’sPerspective, of course!

P

Wiggins, Grant, & McTighe, Jay. (1998). Understanding by Design. ASCD.

McWilliams, 2009


Reviewing the six facets of understanding4

What’s the name of this facet?

Reviewing the SIX FACETS of Understanding

  • It’s described as…

  • Showing metacognitive awareness

  • Being aware of what we don’t understand

  • Perceiving what shapes our own understanding

  • Why it’sSelf-Knowledge, of course!

SK

Wiggins, Grant, & McTighe, Jay. (1998). Understanding by Design. ASCD.

McWilliams, 2009


Reviewing the six facets of understanding5

What’s the name of this facet?

Reviewing the SIX FACETS of Understanding

  • It’s described as…

  • Finding value in what others might find odd, alien, or implausible

  • Perceiving sensitivity on the basis of prior direct experience

  • Why it’sEmpathy, of course!

E

Wiggins, Grant, & McTighe, Jay. (1998). Understanding by Design. ASCD.

McWilliams, 2009


The six facets of understanding1
The Six Facets of Understanding

Superficial Coverage

vs.

Uncovering Big Ideas

Explanation

Interpretation

Application

_______

Perspective

Empathy

Self-Knowledge

Wiggins, Grant, & McTighe, Jay. (1998). Understanding by Design. ASCD.

McWilliams, 2009


Using the six facets in unit planning
Using the Six Facets in Unit Planning

  • How can the Theory of Understanding be applied in unit planning?

  • What might be some ways to use the Six Facets?

  • Share examples of ways you’ve used the Six Facets

McWilliams, 2009


Using ubd in a sophomore biology class

Using UbD in a Sophomore Biology Class

Chuck McWilliams, Biology Teacher

Maplewood-Richmond Heights HS Maplewood, MO

McWilliams, 2009


Planning for a new course
Planning For a “New” Course

  • Develop Course Enduring Understandings

    Ex.) Life functions as a complex system that exists at many different levels

  • Develop Essential Questions

    Ex.) How can scientists lead us to understanding how life functions as a system?

  • Develop course assessments - semester exams

  • Develop individual units and assessments

McWilliams, 2009


A new biology course
A “New” Biology Course

  • How does a(n) ________ come to know the world and humans’ place in it?

  • Each of the eight instructional units focuses on the Perspective of a scientist

  • During the year, each student will become a:

  • Biologist

  • Ecologist

  • Biochemist

  • Cell Biologist

  • Molecular Biologist

  • Geneticist

  • Naturalist

  • Taxonomist

McWilliams, 2009


Learning from different perspectives
Learning from Different Perspectives

Cell Biologist

Molecular Biologist

Biochemist

Geneticist

Ecologist

Naturalist

Student

Biologist

Taxonomist

Biology: Exploring Multiple Scientific Perspectives

McWilliams, 2009


Sample unit unit 6 geneticist

EU

Sample Unit: Unit 6 - Geneticist

Enduring Understandings:

  • Patterns of inheritance can be predicted in living things.

  • Genetic and environmental factors determine the physical characteristics of living things.

  • As genetic research continues, society will face ethical challenges. Participating in the ethical decision making process will require carefully analyzing scientific research and understanding different points of view.

McWilliams, 2009


Essential questions
Essential Questions

What will Guide My Students?

  • If offspring inherit their parents genes, then why don’t they look exactly like their parents?

  • What effect does the environment have on gene expression?

  • How will scientists use the information from generated the Human Genome Project?

McWilliams, 2009


Performance assessment
Performance Assessment

How will I know my students understand?

  • PersonaGen® Array 119™ Genetic Test

    • Students receive a simulated genetic test (multiple tests all at once)

    • They must interpret their profile

    • Research and learn about their assigned “mutations”

    • Write a 6 paragraph essay detailing their profile and the effect it would have on their personal and career life

    • Also included in the essay is a discussion/analysis concerning genetic testing in general

    • In class discussion and rubrics included

McWilliams, 2009


How it all fits together1
How It All Fits Together

McWilliams, 2009


How it all fits together2

W

Where are we going? Why? What is expected?

W

H

E

R

E

T

O

H

How will we hook and hold student interest?

E

How will we equip students for expected performances?

R

How will we help students rethink and revise?

E

How will students self-evaluate and reflect on their learning?

T

How will we tailor the learning plan?

O

How will we organize and sequence the learning?

How It All Fits Together

McWilliams, 2009


How it all fits together3
How It All Fits Together

McWilliams, 2009


Some lessons learned about stage 3

Protecting your favorite activities?

Including FUN activities?

Be aware of TIME and pacing

Scaffold toward the Performance Task and other assessments

Unit Planning vs. Lesson Planning

Some Lessons Learned About Stage 3

McWilliams, 2009


Reviewing the ideas
Reviewing the Ideas

  • In your groups:

  • Compare/contrast the three models: Bloom’s - DOK - Six Facets

  • Group sharing and discussion

McWilliams, 2009


The thinking game
The Thinking Game!

McWilliams, 2009


The key to success
The Key to Success!

“We cannot teach people anything; we can only help them discover it within themselves.”

-Galileo Galilei

16th century Italian scientist

McWilliams, 2009



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