Integrating Positive Youth Development and Pregnancy Prevention

Integrating Positive Youth Development and Pregnancy Prevention PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 239 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Collaborators:. National 4-H Council, University of Arizona, and University of California, DavisNational 4-H Council (Kashyap Choksi)University of Arizona (Sherry Betts, Karen Tepper, Dan McDonald, Lynne Borden, James Roebuck)University of California, Davis (Stephen T Russell, Mike Brockman)

Download Presentation

Integrating Positive Youth Development and Pregnancy Prevention

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


1. Integrating Positive Youth Development and Pregnancy Prevention Kashyap Choksi National 4-H Council Sherry Betts, Karen Tepper, Lynne Borden, Dan McDonald, James Roebuck The University of Arizona Stephen Russell, Mike Brockman University of California, Davis Individual introductions Who is there? Pregnancy prevention in schools Pregnancy prevention in community organizations / programs Youth development programs Researcher / program evaluators State / local program administratorsIndividual introductions Who is there? Pregnancy prevention in schools Pregnancy prevention in community organizations / programs Youth development programs Researcher / program evaluators State / local program administrators

2. Collaborators: National 4-H Council, University of Arizona, and University of California, Davis National 4-H Council (Kashyap Choksi) University of Arizona (Sherry Betts, Karen Tepper, Dan McDonald, Lynne Borden, James Roebuck) University of California, Davis (Stephen T Russell, Mike Brockman) BAPPS Network

3. Bridge for Adolescent Pregnancy, Parenting, and Sexuality -- BAPPS USDA / CSREES network Land-grant university faculty, county-based Extension educators, collaborators 46 States represented; 170 members Website: www.bapps.org

4. Project Information: Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2000-2005. Product: interactive website of curriculum resources. Focus on youth ages 9-13. Built on a youth development approach to help young people avoid unintended pregnancy, STDs, and HIV/AIDS by delaying sexual intercourse. Have John speak here?Have John speak here?

5. The Emergence of the Field of Youth Development In my view, the emerging field of youth development – can be traced first to the existence of youth programs and practices in communities across the US beginning 100 years ago. The centennial of 4-H marks the beginnings of organized efforts in the US to involve youth in nonformal educational activities that both contributed to their communities while enhancing the development of individual life skills. Meanwhile, the past 30 years have seen the emergence of a distinct scientific field – of adolescent development. This field is an outgrowth of 60 years of human and child development research. The field of adolescent development can be traced to the work of people at the land-grant universities – like EmmT Russell, Mike Brockman) BAPPS Network

3. Bridge for Adolescent Pregnancy, Parenting, and Sexuality -- BAPPS USDA / CSREES network Lame of the very first scientific contributions to the area now widely known as RESILIENCE. Only in the last 5-10 years have we begun to see applied research on youth development programs and settings come together as a distinct field – independent of evaluation, of prevention or intervention studies, or of outreach and Extension – but as a scientific field that is developing its own key areas of emphasis, research questions, and methods.In my view, the emerging field of youth development – can be traced first to the existence of youth programs and practices in communities across the US beginning 100 years ago. The centennial of 4-H marks the beginnings of organized efforts in the US to involve youth in nonformal educational activities that both contributed to their communities while enhancing the development of individual life skills. Meanwhile, the past 30 years have seen the emergence of a distinct scientific field – of adolescent development. This field is an outgrowth of 60 years of human and child development research. The field of adolescent development can be traced to the work of people at the land-grant universities – like Emmy Werner at my university – who had the unique idea that we might follow child development over time – and found herself studying adolescents – and wrote some of the very first scientific contributions to the area now widely known as RESILIENCE. Only in the last 5-10 years have we begun to see applied research on youth development programs and settings come together as a distinct field – independent of evaluation, of prevention or intervention studies, or of outreach and Extension – but as a scientific field that is developing its own key areas of emphasis, research questions, and methods.

6. Personal and Social Assets that Facilitate Positive Youth Development Physical development Intellectual development Psychological and emotional development Social development The volume ALSO sets out a framework for thinking about key areas of healthy development – rather than absence of problems. Others have proposed frameworks – and you won’t be surprised to see some overlap EXTRA PAGE HEREThe volume ALSO sets out a framework for thinking about key areas of healthy development – rather than absence of problems. Others have proposed frameworks – and you won’t be surprised to see some overlap EXTRA PAGE HERE

7. Comparing Frameworks My point here is that the models aren’t exclusive – but can be complementary. And there are other models – America’s Promise has theirs, the 5 Cs (that I always forget or else they’d be on the chart), and other organizations. What the NAS report – and the growing research evidence tells us, is that these areas of development are being fostered in the context of community youth programs – that we call youth development. Some early studies of youth programs began to find unintended consequences. Programs that weren’t designed to prevent teen pregnancy, but to promote environmental awareness, for example, were found to have a strong difference on risk taking behavior – unrelated to program content. The growing body of research has begun to suggest that youth developmental programs are doing better than targeted prevention efforts at helping young people learn to make healthy choices – to avoid adolescent problems that we hear so much about – and develop physically, intellectually, emotionally, and socially. My point here is that the models aren’t exclusive – but can be complementary. And there are other models – America’s Promise has theirs, the 5 Cs (that I always forget or else they’d be on the chart), and other organizations. What the NAS report – and the growing research evidence tells us, is that these areas of development are being fostered in the context of community youth programs – that we call youth development. Some early studies of youth programs began to find unintended consequences. Programs that weren’t designed to prevent teen pregnancy, but to promote environmental awareness, for example, were found to have a strong difference on risk taking behavior – unrelated to program content. The growing body of research has begun to suggest that youth developmental programs are doing better than targeted prevention efforts at helping young people learn to make healthy choices – to avoid adolescent problems that we hear so much about – and develop physically, intellectually, emotionally, and socially.

8. Linking Pregnancy Prevention and Positive Youth Development

9. Contemporary Focus on Younger Youth Importance of early prevention Developmentally appropriate given contemporary focus on abstinence Youth developmental approach as alternative or complementary to other approaches that emphasize sexuality education Need for prevention in early childhood, middle and late adolescence In the focus on early prevention and after-school programs, we need to be sure not to overlook the needs of teens Attention to younger youth: Prevention must begin early enough to be relevant for the desired outcome. Culturally / in many communities we are ambivalent about dealing with sexuality -- we don’t have clear consensus on how this should be done. This is particularly true as we talk about younger teens and pre-teens. Politically and culturally we are in a time that emphasizes an avoidance of sexuality through abstinence. Youth developmental efforts provide a scientifically sound -- and culturally appropriate -- method for prevention. Using youth developmental approaches we can focus on the healthy development needs of younger youth without getting into the cultural ambivalence about how to best provide education about sexuality per se for younger youth. Abstinence- applies to lots of health prevention models = smoking, drinking, even sun safety. Attention to younger youth: Prevention must begin early enough to be relevant for the desired outcome. Culturally / in many communities we are ambivalent about dealing with sexuality -- we don’t have clear consensus on how this should be done. This is particularly true as we talk about younger teens and pre-teens. Politically and culturally we are in a time that emphasizes an avoidance of sexuality through abstinence. Youth developmental efforts provide a scientifically sound -- and culturally appropriate -- method for prevention. Using youth developmental approaches we can focus on the healthy development needs of younger youth without getting into the cultural ambivalence about how to best provide education about sexuality per se for younger youth. Abstinence- applies to lots of health prevention models = smoking, drinking, even sun safety.

10. Applying youth development strategies and elements to pregnancy prevention HEAD Academic success Decision-making / reasoning skills Facing challenges / taking initiative HEART Close relationships with caring adults Family relationships HANDS Citizenship and contribution Workforce preparation HEALTH Physical health and well-being Emotional health and well-being

11. Strategies: Youth - Adult Partnerships Nurturing youth-adult partnerships requires an emphasis on youth and their contributions rather than their problems. Age- and development-dependent We know that caring adults -- in addition to parents, or, in some cases, in place of them -- are a common factor among successful youth. Resilience research identified caring adults as critical for healthy development of youth that are “at risk.” Perhaps obvious to us now -- but the implications are profound for way that we engage youth in our communities. (Highlights the limitations of formal education.) Recent years -- emerging emphasis on assets -- focus on strengths of youth rather than their problems. This assets approach is crucial for youth-adult partnerships -- require a conceptual shift from thinking about adults doing “FOR” youth to adults and youth addressing challenges and creating positive change jointly. This form of partnership rarely just happens -- but has to be nurtured. Important to acknowledge that age and developmental issues that play a role. The partnership isn’t “equal” -- because youth and adults bring different strengths and perspectives to partnerships. National 4-H Council has played a leading role nation-wide in research and education in the area of developing our understanding of youth as resources -- and youth adults as partners in community solutions.We know that caring adults -- in addition to parents, or, in some cases, in place of them -- are a common factor among successful youth. Resilience research identified caring adults as critical for healthy development of youth that are “at risk.” Perhaps obvious to us now -- but the implications are profound for way that we engage youth in our communities. (Highlights the limitations of formal education.) Recent years -- emerging emphasis on assets -- focus on strengths of youth rather than their problems. This assets approach is crucial for youth-adult partnerships -- require a conceptual shift from thinking about adults doing “FOR” youth to adults and youth addressing challenges and creating positive change jointly. This form of partnership rarely just happens -- but has to be nurtured. Important to acknowledge that age and developmental issues that play a role. The partnership isn’t “equal” -- because youth and adults bring different strengths and perspectives to partnerships. National 4-H Council has played a leading role nation-wide in research and education in the area of developing our understanding of youth as resources -- and youth adults as partners in community solutions.

12. Strategies: Cross-age Teaching Unique role of teens as teachers of younger youth Benefits for teens Benefits for younger youth Cross-age teaching -- builds from youth-adult partnerships in that it acknowledges the developmental reality that teens play a unique role as role models in the lives of younger youth. Social learning theory tells us that children and youth learn from modeling and observing others. They learn not simply by reinforcement,but by watching and imitating those around them. Research tells us that cross-age teaching is beneficial: For teens: Meaningful, real-world, prosocial activities Builds healthy sense of self (confidence / esteem) Sense of self in relation to younger people -- leadership skills -- view self as contributing member of community. Some programs have demonstrated positive health consequences -- like lower than average substance use and abuse. For younger youth: Benefits of nonformal education Increased academic achievement development of collaboration / conflict resolution skills Taking on values of older teens and institutions that they represent.Cross-age teaching -- builds from youth-adult partnerships in that it acknowledges the developmental reality that teens play a unique role as role models in the lives of younger youth. Social learning theory tells us that children and youth learn from modeling and observing others. They learn not simply by reinforcement,but by watching and imitating those around them. Research tells us that cross-age teaching is beneficial: For teens: Meaningful, real-world, prosocial activities Builds healthy sense of self (confidence / esteem) Sense of self in relation to younger people -- leadership skills -- view self as contributing member of community. Some programs have demonstrated positive health consequences -- like lower than average substance use and abuse. For younger youth: Benefits of nonformal education Increased academic achievement development of collaboration / conflict resolution skills Taking on values of older teens and institutions that they represent.

13. Strategies: Stakeholder Involvement Important for program success Essential for youth / adult partnerships Broad involvement is important when addressing community challenges such as teenage pregnancy Community development theories and practice tell us that successful community initiatives involve broad collaborations of stakeholders. Positive youth development occurs in the context of communities -- linking youth not only to a program of activities and to one another -- but to a larger network that helps them begin to understand themselves in larger context of community and society. Particularly successful method for addressing youth challenges or problems -- because they often are so emotionally-laden or controversial. Involving diverse stakeholders enables a wider perspective and commitment to programs or education for youth.Community development theories and practice tell us that successful community initiatives involve broad collaborations of stakeholders. Positive youth development occurs in the context of communities -- linking youth not only to a program of activities and to one another -- but to a larger network that helps them begin to understand themselves in larger context of community and society. Particularly successful method for addressing youth challenges or problems -- because they often are so emotionally-laden or controversial. Involving diverse stakeholders enables a wider perspective and commitment to programs or education for youth.

14. Workshop Scenarios Using the scenarios provided, locate programs that fit the needs of the situation Choose a strategy and find programs to meet the needs of your community: Youth/adult partnerships Cross-age teaching Stakeholder involvement 1. Are you already using this strategy in your work? Is this development occurs in the context of communities -- linking youth not only to a program of acti? What resources would you need?

15. Building Partnerships for Youth http://www.bpy.n4h.org

  • Login